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Ludvick Visnovec farmLocated on County Road 11 near today's Super America. A smaller white house, also on the property was owned by his brother John. Circa 1980.55555
(1 votes)
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Burnsville Women around haystackChristine Gerdesmeirer, Maye Fahey, Edna O'Brian, Margaret Hayes,Helen Kelleher and Clara Kearney. Burnsville Farm during WWII.

haystack wwII
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John McAndrews around 1915John McAndrews on the family farm - today the site of the Fairview Ridges Hospital.55555
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Joe Kennelly in Republican Governor's officeSome may be surprised to find Joe Kennelly sitting in the chair of Republican Governor Harold LeVander during a visit to the capitol.

In the 1940s, many of the Burnsville farmers on Highway 13 including his father Walter and brother John and sister Rosella and her husband Jim Ryan enlisted then attorney Harold LeVander from the firm LeVander, Gillen and Miller in South St. Paul when the state accessed farm land for the creation of Highway 13.
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(1 votes)
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Patrick McAndrewsPatrick McAndrews was born in 1853, the son of Sarah and Bartly. He married Mary/Maria Jordan on May 31, 1898, in Burnsville, Minnesota. They had six children in 16 years. He died on March 21, 1925, in Burnsville, Minnesota, at the age of 72.55555
(1 votes)
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Margaret and Mary (Fox?) McAndrews55555
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Painting of the Joe and Alice Kearney farm (formerly the George and Stasia Kearney farm) on what is now Neil Park on Upton Avenue. 55555
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Oscar_Dally_Obit.pdf
Oscar Dally obituary by Dick DeurreApril 4, 1977
Dolly's Place is a small, neat old building nestled on Crystal Lake Road. When Mr. Dally started the business in 1923 it was a grocery store but now most of the sales are beer, pop and candy. The customers are from the Crystal Lake neighborhood and start buying at an early age. It is not unusual to see a three or four-year-old standing in front of the candy counter trying to decide what to spend his nickel or dime on. Dally was always a marvel, he'd stand there pa­tiently while the young customers would waver between picking a Bub's Daddy or a Marathon Bar.

The decision could take many minutes and involve several changes before becoming final. Many young custom­ers couldn’t even count their money and Mr. Dally would patiently explain what they owed. I noticed that many times he'd slip an extra goody into the bag of a favored young client. His patience was matched by his generosity.

The lure of Dolly's place is almost irresistible to Crystal Lake youngsters. This past winter our seven-year-old and his 10-year- old sister fastened on their cross country skis and took a two-mile trip across and back on Crystal Lake. Upon returning they said "It was cold but it was worth it to go to Dolly's."
Later that day their mother and I took a short tour on skis and quit early because the numbing cold drove us inside. Only then did we learn from WCCO that the wind chill was 40 degrees below.
Our kids have learned to row a boat and paddle a canoe at an earlier than normal age. Their main incentive for learning early was to enable them to go to Dolly’s Place by them­selves.
Oscar Dally was a remarkable man. After losing a leg in a railroad accident he moved to Crystal Lake in 1923. He and his wife started the business. She died in 1955. Since then he managed the place alone but had help from his daughter, Mrs. Al Kraft and his son Frank. Between them they created an institution that has served many generations ofCrystal Lakers. Oscar Dally, who died at 91, will be remembered fondly, by people who are less than 10 years old today,all their lives. We will all miss him.
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Funeral program for Marie McAndrews55555
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