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nina.pdf
Nina's grill to be replaced by Tavern 13 - 2019Nina’s Grill to be replaced by Tavern 13- by John Gessner Oct 14, 2019 Burnsville Eagan Sun/Thisweek News

A Burnsville bar and restaurant known for its Russian cuisine and proprietors has closed.

Nina’s Grill, originally the Russian Tavern, is being replaced by another bar and restaurant, Tavern 13. The business is near Highway 13 at 2510 Horizon Drive.

The City Council approved Tavern 13’s on-sale and Sunday on-sale liquor license Oct. 8. The owner, Randall Cooper, also owns Cooper’s Restaurant at 4185 S. Robert Trail in Eagan.

Tavern 13’s American menu will include burgers, chicken, steak, appetizers and flatbreads, said a city staff report.

Nina’s, which opened in 2003, was owned by Nina Kouljinski and her husband, Igor, who hailed from the Russian city of St. Petersburg. The restaurant’s menu included Russian dishes such as borscht, stroganoff and cabbage rolls.

Nina’s came under some scrutiny after a pair of murders in 2013. A 23-year-old Savage man, Palagor Jobi, was shot to death outside the bar at closing time on Sept. 22 after getting into a fight with his killer, 33-year-old Shavelle Chavez-Nelson.

In the early morning hours of Sept. 22 Chavez-Nelson stabbed to death a former girlfriend, Anarae Schunk, who had been with him at the bar. Schunk, 20, was a University of Minnesota student and Burnsville High School graduate.

A brother of Schunk’s called publicly for Nina’s to close.

Oct 16, 2019
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Valley Natural FoodsValley Natural Foods gathering area, 2019.Oct 16, 2019
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Valley Natural FoodsValley Natural Foods, October 2019.Oct 16, 2019
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Valley Natural FoodsOctober, 2019 Valley Natural Foods.Oct 14, 2019
blackdog_fire.pdf
Mayday at Black Dog: Fire fighters recount power plant explosion 2012April 17, 2012 Burnsville Patch.

By Clare Kennedy, Patch Staff

Sept. 21, 2010 will be remembered as a close call for the Burnsville Fire Department. That day four firefighters were literally baptized in flame — and lived to tell the tale.

"I sometimes wonder why we're alive, to this day," said Capt. Bill Schaetzel, who has spent 23 years with the BFD.

He can still remember the exact time the call came in — 7:29 a.m. A coal fire at Xcel's Black Dog Power Plant.

Calls from the power plant are unusual.

"They usually handle their own situations," said Steve Boardman, a fire motor operator and paramedic who has been with the BFD for 11 years. "If we get a call it heightens our concern. They don't do that very often."

Capt. Joel Clasen's team arrived on the scene and sent in Firefighter Shawn Hill, who was one of the first inside the plant. The team found lethal levels of carbon monoxide in the air inside the plant and immediately evacuated the employees. With an infrared camera, they found a growing heat spot in the middle of a coal bunker — a huge internal silo 70 feet high and 40 feet wide.

Schaetzel, Boardman and Firefighters Tom Hale and Matt Ostendorf followed Hill in. Burdened with air packs, hoses and monitoring equipment, the four of them hurried through . Their objective was to do reconnaissance and report back. They ended up on a sixth floor catwalk adjacent to the bunker. The fire was burning in the center, which meant that a cavity was developing inside the pile of coal. If it collapsed it would send up a cloud of super-combustible dust that could envelop all nearby. The dust could explode or ignite at any moment with just a single spark from an incoming rail car.

Within minutes, Boardman and Ostendorf noticed a frightening change. The smoke from below was pouring out faster, with more pressure behind it.

"That was about all the warning we had," Boardman said.

There was a terrible sound — like the roar of a jet engine — and then the explosion was upon them. Schaetzel only had time to turn his head before the firefighters were blown right off their feet, flying two to four feet in the air, and crushed against the catwalk railings. Hale was tossed down a steel stairway.

Andy Hamlin, part of the rapid intervention team tasked with rescues, was outside when the deafening blast sounded.

"We looked up and saw smoke flying out of the north side, the windows blasted out. The Xcel employees all ran to the far end of the parking lot," Hamlin recalled. "That's not good at all when you see that. Those guys know that place inside and out."

Hamlin began preparing for the worst. He didn't know if he would find his colleagues alive or dead. Then a call came through from the plant's ravaged, smoking interior — "Mayday."

The call came from Hill, who was working several levels below Schaetzel's crew. He saw the fireball raging up toward his colleagues. Hill scaled the catwalk, and found the four enveloped in blanket of haze and soot, but conscious and mostly unscathed, though Hale sustained an injury to his knee that later required surgery. The five of them made a hasty exit.

It took the BFD and partner agencies 10 grueling hours to put out the fire, which had spread from the bunker to the roof. Once the smoke cleared, the BFD assessed the wreckage. The explosion tore apart Black Dog's west wall and caused extensive damage inside. A coal conveyor belt that weighed well over a ton was lifted off the ground, completely stripping the bolts that held it fast in a bed of solid concrete.

In retrospect, Hill, Schaetzel and Boardman find their survival almost miraculous. They could have easily been blown off the catwalk to their deaths. If they'd been any closer to the source of the explosion — which was behind a nearby wall — they most likely would not have made it.

"I'm surprised that we were right there and we all walked away from it," Hill said. "No one got critically injured. That's got to be rare."

However, all involved tend to be reticent about their experience.

"It's hard for us to talk about how dangerous our jobs are," Boardman said. "It was pretty scary. We're very lucky."

"The bottom line is that the five of us walked out together," Schaetzel added.

Though many in the department find it hard to talk about, Boardman said he felt it was important for the people of Burnsville to hear. The city council agreed. On April 3, the BFD honored those who put their lives on the line to contain the Black Dog fire.

"This situation easily could have been lethal. The actions performed by the crew recognized tonight undoubtedly saved lives from being lost and further injuries from occurring," said Fire Chief BJ Jungmann. "It takes a long time for them to physically and mentally recover from something like that. As much as fire fighters might not want to believe they are human, these situations remind us how important our commitment is to the community."

Jungmann presented the Bar of Meritorious Action to Capt. Paul Young, Jeff Gutzwiller, Scott Hanlon, Kully Hauser, Capt. Terry Ritchie, Mike Andrews, Assistant Fire Chief Brian Carlson, Kyle Engen, Tim Finley, Jamie Gerard, Dan Hale, Andy Hamlin, Mike Klarich, Chris Knettel, Jayson Knutson, Andy Leach, Ryan Paradowski, and Inspector Jan Trom.

Capt. Joel Clasen was awarded the department's Award of Merit.

The four caught in the explosion were given the Medal of Valor and Hill received the highest recognition, Medal of Honor, for helping his colleagues navigate out of a perilous situation.

"Without him there could have been injury and death. He showed composure and great courage under adverse conditions that saved many lives and prevented further injury that day," Jungmann said.

When asked about the award, Hill replied that what he did is a part of the job and that his colleagues would have done the same for him.

"We were pretty close before and that hasn't changed," Hill said. "It begins as a brotherhood and it ends as a brotherhood."
Oct 14, 2019
smokestack_story.pdf
Contractor uses remote-controlled demolition robot to demolish xcel smokestacks at Black Dog Power Plant 2019An article appearing online at forconstructionpros.com - September 30, 2019

Midwest contractor employs innovative techniques to take its business to new heights and demolish iconic smokestacks which marks the official end to the plant's coal burning days.

A 450-ton Manitowoc 2250 crane outfitted with a custom box lifts and carries the Brokk 500 during the demolition process.Brokk Inc.They went from being a skyline staple to an obsolete eyesore. Since the 1950s, the Xcel Energy Black Dog power plant smokestacks punctuated the Burnsville, MN, skyline. But the view is changing, as the iconic smokestacks are being demolished, marking the official end of the plant’s coal burning days.

In an effort to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, Black Dog is one of the latest U.S. power plants to convert from coal to natural gas. The process — expected to cost $100 million — began in 1999, when two units were replaced with natural gas. The most visible changes started in July 2018, when Veit & Company, a Minneapolis-based specialty contractor, utilized robotic demolition to begin the next phase of the process.


A Community Staple: Black Dog brought in coal from Wyoming’s Powder River Basin for more than 60 years, first on barges coming down the Minnesota River, which surrounds the plant, and then by railcar. Seeking to slash their carbon dioxide output, Xcel set a goal to produce 63% of its electricity from carbon-free sources by 2030. During its last year burning coal — 2014 — only two of the four original units were still operational. That year, the plant was still burning 12,500 tons of coal each week, releasing in 1.9 million tons of carbon dioxide into the air, according to state data.

Black Dog isn’t the only company that has made its mark as a historical establishment. Veit boasts an even longer history of serving the region. Frank Veit founded the company in 1928, and 90 years later, it’s still family owned and operated. Vaughn A. Veit is the third-generation owner, preceded by his father, Arthur. Throughout its storied history, Veit led the way in Minnesota in terms of new, innovative equipment. The company has often been the first in the state to purchase new technology: the first CAT D8H dozer with a hydraulic ripper in 1959; the first CAT 966C articulated loader in 1963; and the first Numa down-the-hole hammer in 2002. In 2005, the company purchased its first demolition robot, a Brokk 330, and then added a Brokk 180 in 2007.

The company’s foray into remote-controlled demolition began because of a project in downtown Minneapolis: a large interior demolition job that required the purchase of a Brokk to remove floor slabs. The structure’s limited space restricted larger equipment but was more than spacious enough for the 2-ton Brokk 180 and its high power-to-weight ratio. The Veit team was able to complete the project 25% faster than they would have with hand tools alone. The versatile machines opened the door to additional demolition projects, including the kind of top-down demolition required to safely take down two of Black Dog’s smokestacks.

Brokk Veit4Veit utilized the Brokk 500 to take two of the structures down to 120 feet, bringing them within reach of a CAT 365 Ultra-High-Reach excavator that demolished the remaining portions of the smokestacks.Brokk Inc. “Our method of demolition with the Brokk remote-controlled machines is what’s gotten us these jobs,” said Ryan Olson, Veit general superintendent of demolition. “Without them, it would be an incredibly labor-intensive process, not to mention that it would put workers at risk for potential injuries.”
The right tools for the job: In the case of the Black Dog power plant, Veit’s approach began with a focus on protecting the structures around the smokestacks. Portions of the power plant facility are as close as 30 feet to the stacks, and without protection could easily be damaged by falling debris.

Olson’s team began by fabricating an enclosure over the existing pipe rack on the 300-foot smokestacks, extending the I-beam structure to support the timber protection. Then they moved in the equipment, including a 450-ton Manitowoc 2250 crane outfitted with a custom box for lifting and carrying the demolition robot.

While Veit’s Brokk 330 machines were tried, tested and proven, the contractor chose to do a rent-to-purchase option on a new Brokk 500. The machine features a reinforced design and a vertical reach of 24.3 feet as well as an impressive power-to-weight ratio.

“The Brokk 330 gave us a huge productivity jump over hand labor but upgrading to the larger Brokk 500 was a complete game changer,” Olson said. “We’re getting 30% more productivity from the 500 than from our Brokk 330.”

That productivity doesn’t just come from the larger machine size, but also the type of attachment. Breakers come standard on Brokk machines, but Veit upgraded to a pulverizer attachment a couple of years ago. The Darda 700 concrete pulverizer delivers 600 tons of crushing capacity and has wear-resistant steel alloy crusher tips and cutter blades. It is ideally suited for top-down demolition, making it a perfect fit for this project.

“The pulverizer increases productivity over a hydraulic hammer,” Olson said. “It has been a great addition and has saved us a lot of time on projects.”

Demolition from the top down: Smokestack demolition is no easy task. It requires determination, organization and extreme attention to detail.

Traditional smokestack demolition involves numerous tools and six to eight crew members who are willing to take the risk of working at dangerous heights. In a traditional manual demolition, crew members would install ring scaffolding around the smokestack, and work in 5- or 6-foot increments to hand-remove the material from the top down. Each of the two smaller, 300-foot-tall, 78-foot-circumference smokestacks had a wall thickness of 4 inches at the top and 17 inches at the bottom. The thick concrete requires more man power to demolish with handheld tools. Besides safety, there are other factors that make a remote-controlled demolition machine a much more attractive option for projects like this: lack of experienced laborers in the current workforce, the difficulty of extreme hard labor with heavy hand tools, and weather limitations such as hot, cold or windy conditions.

Opting for remote-controlled demolition allowed crews to stay out of harm’s way, while getting the work done 25% faster than they would have with handheld tools. Plus, Veit only needed a 1/3 of the workers that would typically be used on a demolition project like this.

Brokk Veit3Opting for remote-controlled demolition allowed for crews to stay out of harm’s way, while getting the work done 25% faster than they would have with handheld tools.Brokk Inc.During the demolition, the operator directed the Brokk 500 from a control room, using screens displaying the view from the machine’s three cameras to safely monitor the situation while breaking away at the two 300-foot smokestacks. Crane operators, Brokk operators and ground crew all had radio communication throughout to minimize the risk of errors.

Veit took the two structures down to 120 feet, bringing them within reach of a CAT 365 Ultra-High-Reach excavator that demolished the remaining portions of the smokestacks down to 40 feet. From that point, a CAT 336 excavator equipped with a Genesis LXP 200 Concrete Cracker completed the rest of the demolition.

Crews then started cleanup and maintenance. Veit used excavators to reach inside the smokestack and remove built-up material, such as concrete, rebar and brick. The contractor collected and transported more than 13,000 tons of debris, recycling 100% of the materials. The steel was sent to be melted down to make new products, and the concrete was hauled away to be crushed for use as base material for roads and parking lots.

Looking to the future: The entire renovation process is expected to be complete in 2019, when Veit will tackle the last — and largest — smokestack. The third structure, called the common stack, is 600-feet-tall and had a base circumference of 180 feet. The smokestack will be demolished with handheld tools down to a height of 120 feet, and then will be fully removed with the CAT 365 High-Reach. The contractor won’t use the Brokk 500 for the structure because of costs associated with requiring a much larger crane.

Once all outdated structures are removed, the plant will be fully converted to a natural gas energy provider. In 2014, the last year of coal burning, Black Dog was Minnesota’s fourth-largest carbon polluter among power plants. Once the conversion to natural gas is complete, it will have a total summer production of 496 megawatts from three gas units and 530 megawatts of capacity in the winter.

While it may be more difficult to spot Burnsville on an arrival flight to Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, Black Dog power plant is still on the scene in the city, providing energy to tens of thousands of residents.
Oct 14, 2019
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Black Dog Power PlantA rendering shows the design of the rebuilt Black Dog Power Plant in Burnsville, 2011.Oct 14, 2019
blackdog_story.pdf
Xcel Energy to make over Black Dog power plant 2011By Leslie Brooks Suzukamo | lsuzukamo@pioneerpress.com |
PUBLISHED: March 15, 2011 St. Paul Pioneer Press


Xcel Energy formally asked Minnesota regulators Tuesday for permission to retire the last two coal-burning units at its 59-year-old Black Dog power plant in Burnsville and replace them with modern natural gas turbines.

The plan would more than double the electrical output of the plant from 253 megawatts to 700 megawatts and cost about $600 million, Xcel officials said.

The utility first signaled its intent in August to convert the aging plant, a move cheered by environmentalists and public health advocates.

“People won’t see quite as much coming out of the stack. The reports we get downwind from Black Dog were that people would get ash settling on their vehicles,” said Robert Moffitt, spokesman for the American Lung Association in Minnesota.

The plant, built in 1952 with a single coal-burning unit, evolved over the decades. By 1960, it had four coal units, but in 2002, two of those units were decommissioned, plant director Tom Fallgren said.

Xcel installed the first of its natural gas-burning turbines then and it used the steam exhaust from that turbine to power another turbine kept from one of the decommissioned coal units, Fallgren said.

If approved, Minneapolis-based Xcel next year would tear down the last two coal units and begin construction on a natural gas facility in 2013.

The facility would have two combustion cycle turbines to produce power. A third turbine will be fed by the steam produced by the gas-burning units, Fallgren said.

The facility would employ 300 construction workers over the project period and come online in 2016, Xcel officials said.

The Black Dog plant work is similar to the utility’s recent makeover of its High Bridge and Riverside plants in St. Paul and Minneapolis. Both were aging coal-burning plants that were torn down and replaced with cleaner burning natural gas.

Leslie Brooks Suzukamo can be reached at 651-228-5475.
Oct 14, 2019
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Black Dog Power PlantOctober, 2019 view of the Black Dog Power Plant, being removed.
Photo by Burnsville Historical Society.

Elizabeth Dunbar | MPR News

Crews have begun removing 7-by-7-foot chunks of concrete and rebar from a 600-foot-tall coal chimney in Burnsville as part of Xcel Energy's transition away from coal-fired power.

The Black Dog power plant started burning coal in the 1950s. It arrived by train, and the tall chimney was needed to disperse pollutants to minimize the risk to people living nearby.

But Xcel stopped burning coal at the plant in 2015 as part of its larger transition away from coal, in part to address the greenhouse gas emissions contributing to climate change....
Oct 14, 2019
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Valley Natural FoodsOctober, 2019 Valley Natural Foods.Oct 14, 2019
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Valley Natural FoodsOctober, 2019 Valley Natural Foods meals and socializing area.Oct 14, 2019
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Valley Natural FoodsOctober, 2019 Valley Natural Foods.Oct 14, 2019
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Valley Natural FoodsOctober, 2019 view of Valley Natural Foods.Oct 14, 2019
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Valley Natural FoodsOctober, 2019 view of Valley Natural Foods.Oct 14, 2019
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Buck Hill 2018Summer view of Buck Hill.Oct 13, 2019
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Midwest Federal being built in Burnsville 1980February 19, 1980 - Midwest Federal to be built on County Road 42 near the Burnsville Center.Oct 10, 2019
lindsey_story.pdf
Kildow's Climb, to inspire: Buck Hill dedicates its tow rope in honor of Lindsey Vonn 2019September 26, 2019 - Burnsville Eagan Sun/Thisweek News: By Tad Johnson.

“Anything is possible.”

That’s what Lindsey Vonn told wide-eyed young skiers Monday during a dedication ceremony for the tow rope that ferried a young Lindsey Caroline Kildow hundreds of times to the top of Buck Hill.

The tow rope, which will be called “Kildow’s Climb,” will include markers along the way that tell the story of Vonn’s rise to become the world’s most successful female skier of all time.

The day’s schedule allotted Vonn 15 minutes to greet people in the chalet, but she lingered in the main building for much longer than that, posing for photos, signing autographs and chatting with people young and old.

Some of the children had her sign photographs, their shirts and ski helmets; one girl brought a report she did on the Olympic gold medalist, four-time World Cup champion and most decorated female World Cup skier of all time with 82 World Cup wins.

There were plenty of smiles and hugs from Vonn and the young skiers as nearly all in line had time to meet her. Vonn also gave time for pictures and autograph signing on the hill after the dedication ceremony.

“Little Lindsey Vonn, who would have thought of the accomplishments she would have in a lifetime,” Buck Hill President and CEO David Solner said during the ceremony. “You are such an inspiration for everyone here, the kids and community.”

Solner presented Vonn with a section of the tow rope mounted on a trophy stand, and Monday, Sept. 23, 2019, was designated as Lindsey Vonn Day in the city of Burnsville, as Mayor Elizabeth Kautz read and presented a framed copy of the proclamation to Vonn.

Vonn said she wanted to use the family name for the tow rope since it was her grandfather who got the family into skiing and also built a tow rope in Wisconsin.

“My dad started me here at Buck Hill. Before I could even ski I was in a backpack while he was coaching and going to law school at the same time,” Vonn said during a media interview. “My family just has a long history with skiing … and I didn’t really feel right to have, you know, not their name incorporated into it, and I know my family’s really excited about it, so it’s pretty cool.”

“Kildow’s Climb is here to show you that anything is possible,” Vonn told the crowd of about 200 people during the dedication ceremony. “Keep the Buck name alive. I hope to see you guys in the Olympics someday.”

She said in a later interview that the tow rope was “100 percent a part” of the reason that as a young skier she was able to take a lot of runs at Buck Hill from the time she was a toddler until about age 12, before the family moved to Vail, Colorado.

“You can get 20 to 25 runs a night here where in the mountains you can only get five runs a day,” Vonn said. “That’s a big advantage when you are young and getting started.”

The Kildows lived in Apple Valley during Lindsey’s early years, and she trained under Buck Hill Ski Team coach Erich Sailer, who helped guide several skiers to international success.

“I have a lot of great memories here,” Vonn said. “I would sit up at the shack at the top with Erich sometimes when it was cold.”

They would talk about skiing and focus on ways to improve.

She said it being a little cold was the only bad memory of training at Buck Hill, but the cold also provided the kind of icy conditions skiers need to excel against the best competition.

“Obviously being from Buck is not the most likely of paths to become an Olympic downhill champion,” Vonn said. “But I think I proved to all of you kids racing here that anything is possible.”

She said the event was like a reunion, seeing many people she hadn’t seen in a long time, including former skiers and the parents of those she used to ski with at Buck Hill.

“It is really meaningful I feel so much love and support every time I come back,” Vonn said. “Coming back here as an adult, it’s a little bit smaller than when I remember it as a kid. It seemed really big when I was a kid.

“I have a lot of great memories here,” she said. “It has been a fun day.”

Solner said he was thrilled with Monday’s event.

“I was very happy with it,” he said. “My wife, Chip, and I are super excited to honor her.”

When the installation is complete it will relate Vonn’s foundation at Buck Hill at the bottom of the tow rope and her rise to the pinnacle of the ski world at the top.

“I think there’s going to be a lot of people who come out just to see what it looks like and ride it,” Solner said.

Barb Everson, owner of the Ski Challenge that meets at Buck Hill, said she thought the event was great since it brought the Minnesota ski racing community together.

“There were young racers, high school racers, college racers and adult racers all in attendance as well as supportive parents and coaches,” she said. “Everyone in this community is really proud to say that Lindsey (Kildow) Vonn is from Buck Hill and from Minnesota. Naming the rope tow on the race training hill is such a great idea and a good way to honor Lindsey and continue to inspire racers of all ages at Buck Hill.
Oct 05, 2019
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GLM at Buck HillDecember 11, 1975:

The fastest, easiest, safest way to improve your skiing....
Oct 02, 2019
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Skiing comes of age here - 1967November 16, 1967 Minneapolis Star Tribune reports: The first Olympic medalist to head a Minnesota ski school arrived at Buck Hill, Burnsville, this week, Tony Spiss...Oct 02, 2019
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Tony Spiss at Buck Hill 1967.November 16, 1967 - MInneapolis Star Tribune:

Dry Land Jump - Frank Freeman, 15, MInneapolis jumped over ski poles as part of dry land training by 30 members of the Buck Hill Junior racing team in preparation for the ski season. The team also plays soccer and holds cycle sprints under the tutelage of Tony Spiss, former Austraian team coach and Olympic medal winner.
Oct 02, 2019
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Snow making at Buck Hill 1970November 2, 1970 - MInneapolis Star Tribune:

Gary McNevin, an employee at Buck Hill, began frosting the slopes Sunday with one of the ski area's snow making machines.
The temperature had plunged near zero by early this morning.
Oct 02, 2019
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Gopher Heating SavageGopher Heating, Savage was owned by Joe Zilka of Burnsville. May 30, 1961 Minneapolis Star Tribune ad.Oct 02, 2019
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Lindsey Kildow VonnBuck Hill Dedicates Rope Tow to Local Legend Lindsey Vonn

The world may know her as Lindsey Vonn, but the Minnesota community that watched her grow into one of the greatest ski racers in history still remembers little Lindsey Caroline Kildow climbing up Buck Hill’s simple rope tow.

On Monday, September 23 2019, Buck Hill was proud to commemorate young Lindsey Kildow’s ascent to the top of our sport on site with the official naming of the “Kildow’s Climb” rope tow.

September 23 was also declared “Lindsey Vonn Day” in Burnsville, Minnesota.

Vonn, the daughter of local ski racer Alan Kildow, got her racing start at the Burnsville ski area at a young age. Patrons remember seeing her soaring down the hill when she was only 2 years old, and just five years later she began riding up the rope that will now bear her name.

“My dad started me here at Buck Hill,” Vonn told local news outlets. “Before I could even ski I was in a backpack while he was coaching and going to law school at the same time. My family just has a long history with skiing … and I didn’t really feel right to have, you know, not their name incorporated into it, and I know my family’s really excited about it, so it’s pretty cool.”

Under the guidance of Erich Sailer, legendary ski racing coach and founder of the Buck Hill Ski Racing Team, who has produced some of the world’s most successful skiers, Vonn started on a path towards international fame, medals, and awards.

Highlights of Lindsey’s:
• Four Overall World Cup titles (2008, 2009, 2010, 2012)
• 82 World Cup victories – more than any other female ski racer in the sport’s history
• 2010 Olympic gold medal in the Vancouver women’s downhill

With her trademark grit, courage, and determination, Vonn has inspired a whole new generation of young athletes who now hope to climb to the top in her footsteps.

“All of us at Buck Hill are very happy and excited to honor Lindsey by renaming our lift on the race training hill in her name.” says Dave Solner, owner of Buck Hill.

Release courtesy of Buck Hill.
Sep 25, 2019
lindsey.jpg
Lindsey Kildow VonnBuck Hill Dedicates Rope Tow to Local Legend Lindsey Vonn

The world may know her as Lindsey Vonn, but the Minnesota community that watched her grow into one of the greatest ski racers in history still remembers little Lindsey Caroline Kildow climbing up Buck Hill’s simple rope tow.

On Monday, September 23 2019, Buck Hill was proud to commemorate young Lindsey Kildow’s ascent to the top of our sport on site with the official naming of the “Kildow’s Climb” rope tow.

September 23 was also declared “Lindsey Vonn Day” in Burnsville, Minnesota.

Vonn, the daughter of local ski racer Alan Kildow, got her racing start at the Burnsville ski area at a young age. Patrons remember seeing her soaring down the hill when she was only 2 years old, and just five years later she began riding up the rope that will now bear her name.

“My dad started me here at Buck Hill,” Vonn told local news outlets. “Before I could even ski I was in a backpack while he was coaching and going to law school at the same time. My family just has a long history with skiing … and I didn’t really feel right to have, you know, not their name incorporated into it, and I know my family’s really excited about it, so it’s pretty cool.”

Under the guidance of Erich Sailer, legendary ski racing coach and founder of the Buck Hill Ski Racing Team, who has produced some of the world’s most successful skiers, Vonn started on a path towards international fame, medals, and awards.

Highlights of Lindsey’s:
• Four Overall World Cup titles (2008, 2009, 2010, 2012)
• 82 World Cup victories – more than any other female ski racer in the sport’s history
• 2010 Olympic gold medal in the Vancouver women’s downhill

With her trademark grit, courage, and determination, Vonn has inspired a whole new generation of young athletes who now hope to climb to the top in her footsteps.

“All of us at Buck Hill are very happy and excited to honor Lindsey by renaming our lift on the race training hill in her name.” says Dave Solner, owner of Buck Hill.

Release courtesy of Buck Hill.
Sep 25, 2019
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Cobblestone Court adApril 16, 1981 ad for Easter Season at Cobblestone Court, County Road 42.Sep 24, 2019
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Ad for Sioux Trail NurseryApril 16, 1981 Sioux Trail Nursery ad in the Minneapolis Star Tribune.Sep 24, 2019
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Burnsville Hospital backed at hearingSeptember 9, 1981 Minneapolis Star Tribune: Bruce Haskin, project director for Fairview Community Hospitals, spoke to about 600 people who turned out to support the hospitals' proposal to build a $25.7 million, 150 bed hospital in Burnsville...Sep 24, 2019
Newsletter-Fall-2019.pdf
Living Naturally - the Valley Natural Foods community newsletterValley Natural Foods Newsletter - Fall, 2019.Sep 23, 2019
xcel_story.pdf
Fire at Blackdog power plant injures worker 2015March 17, 2015 Minneapolis Star Tribune reports on fire at Blackdog Power Plant. Included is a photo of fire chief B. J. Jungmann. Sep 23, 2019
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Better Business Bureau based in BurnsvilleOriginally there was a Better Business Bureau Minneapolis and one for St. Paul. They later merged into the Better Business Bureau of Minnesota and today is located at 220 S. River Ridge Circle as the Better Business Bureau of Minnesota and North Dakota. Sep 20, 2019
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