A powerful research tool for the serious or casual visitor.
Last additions
early_police_car.jpg
Burnsville Police carThis is one of Burnsville's first police cars, undated.Apr 23, 2019
Burnsville_fire_and_police_undated.jpg
Burnsville Public Safety At the time of this photo (undated) the police and fire department operated together as the Public Safety Department.Apr 23, 2019
reorganize.pdf
Burnsville Public Safety reorganizes 1977September 1, 1977 Dakota County Tribune reports on the reorganization of the Burnsville Public Safety Department.Apr 23, 2019
cable_story.pdf
Broadcasting Burnsville 2015March 25, 2015 Minneapolis Star Tribune feature story about Burnsville's Community Television.Apr 21, 2019
mayor_to_lead_Thu__Jun_26__2008_.jpg
Mayor Kautz in line to lead colleagues on national council 2008June 26, 2008 Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that Burnsville Mayor would be the first Minnesotan to head the group. She was elected to the leadership council of the US Conference of Mayors and is scheduled to become the president in 2010...Apr 21, 2019
Mayor_will_lead___Jun_11__2010_.jpg
Kauth will lead nation's mayors 2010June 22, 2010 Minneapolis Star Tribune reports: Burnsville mayor will lead the annual meeting of the US Conference of Mayors this weekend as the groups president...Apr 21, 2019
graduate.jpg
Officer Lauren Smith and K9 Jet 2017May, 2017 City of Burnsville Website: Burnsville Police Officer Lauren Smith and K9 "Jet" -- Graduates of the 2017 Saint Paul Police K9 School!Apr 21, 2019
k_9_to_retire.pdf
K9 cops retire, 2010The St.Paul Pioneer Press, January 2, 2010 reports:


Burnsville / As K-9 cops retire, city raises cash for new dogs

By Jess Fleming | jfleming@pioneerpress.com | Pioneer Press
PUBLISHED: January 2, 2010 at 11:01 pm | UPDATED: November 11, 2015 at 8:19 am

This week, when Burnsville police officer Shaun Anselment begins his new day shift with the department, his old partner will probably be waiting to hop into the squad car.

But Stryker, Anselment’s police dog, will have to learn to stay put.

Monday is Stryker’s last day as a working dog, and the transition to family pet will probably be a little rocky, Anselment said. But with three children younger than 5 in the house, Anselment’s night shift — a requirement for K-9 handlers — was wearing on his family.

“(Stryker) waits by the door for me,” Anselment said. “It’ll take a few months for him to realize there’s no more police car, and it’ll take awhile for him to get used to staying home and chilling out.”

Stryker, a 7-year-old German shepherd from the Czech Republic, has been with Anselment for five years. Anselment and his wife, Danielle Anselment, say the dog is very protective and their children tackle him and wrestle him — and love him — just like any other dog.

“He’s just part of the family,” Shaun Anselment said.

Dagger, the department’s other K-9 officer, will retire at the end of this year.

Burnsville Police Chief Bob Hawkins said the department is raising money to help pay for the dogs’ replacements. The department has set up a page on the city’s Web site with information about the program and ways to contribute.

It’s the first time Burnsville has attempted to raise money outside the city budget for the dogs, which cost $6,000 to $8,000 apiece, Hawkins said. Training for each dog runs an additional $1,500.

“It used to be the program would just advertise for donations of dogs,” Hawkins said. “But now the breeding in the U.S. is so poor for German shepherds that they have had to start bringing in dogs from Europe.”

Poorly bred dogs have narrow hips, Hawkins said, and can’t stand up to the required training.

Burnsville has had a K-9 program since the early 1980s. Hawkins said that with the city’s tight budget, he considered cutting the program to save money.

“But it’s just been a tremendous resource for us,” Hawkins said, so they decided to try raising the money. “We’ll do whatever it takes. If we have to do fundraising, get grant dollars, we’ll do it.”

In September, the Arbors at Ridges senior housing complex in Burnsville held a spaghetti luncheon that raised $1,500 for the dogs, and Hawkins said checks from individuals have been trickling in. He didn’t have an updated total.

Regardless, Hawkins said, the department will make other cuts, if it must, to fund the program. The new dogs will be arriving soon so their new handlers can begin bonding with them.

The dogs will complete a 12-week training program at the St. Paul Canine Training Center before going to work, where they are used for tracking criminals, evidence search and recovery, and narcotics detection.

Stryker was involved in several dangerous cases, Anselment said.

On a recent assault call, a suspect wouldn’t come out of his house, and he had a knife.

Anselment strapped a knife- and bullet-proof vest onto the dog and sent him in.

“Stryker got him,” Anselment said. “We took him into custody, and no one got hurt.”

Last year, the dog tracked a man who had taken an overdose of prescription pills and wandered away from his home.

Stryker found him a half-mile away, face-down in his own vomit. The man survived. Anselment and Stryker received an award from the United States Police Canine Association for their actions.

Though the Anselments say they are looking forward to spending more time together as a family, they will miss the special events and attention that go with having a K-9 officer. Anselment said he did dozens of demonstrations with the dog for area schoolchildren. And his children are proud of their pet — and their dad.

“The kids have really enjoyed seeing their dad and what they see as their dog out there working,” Danielle Anselment said. “I have no doubt that Stryker will adjust into retirement, and we’ll keep him plenty busy, but this is definitely bittersweet.”

Jessica Fleming can be reached at 651-228-5435.

K-9 Fund

Burnsville police have set up a Web page to accept donations: burnsville.org/index.aspx?NID=937.

You also can donate by calling Sgt. Bentley Jackson at 952-895-4598 or sending money directly to the Burnsville Police Department.
Apr 21, 2019
dog_history.pdf
Burnsville K9 history 2019This history of the dogs that served Burnsville appeared on the 2019 Police Department website.Apr 21, 2019
regal_story.pdf
Eagan Theatre closes 2019 Eagan Regal Cinemas 16 Closes After 20-Year Run
As what comes next for the property unfolds, local moviegoers will have to look toward neighboring cities to fulfill their viewing needs.
By Tyler Baillif, Neighbor | Apr 19, 2019 9:30 pm ET | Updated Apr 19, 2019 11:54 pm ET

Eagan moviegoers looking to see the epic conclusion of Avengers: Endgame in theaters next week will have to look toward neighboring cities to do so. After a more than 20-year run since it was built in 1998, Regal Cinemas 16 on Cliff Road is closed indefinitely. What comes next for the property however, may not be all bad for moviegoers.

Having previously worked at the theater, I learned through former coworkers that yesterday would be the final day its doors were open. The closure was so sudden, I felt compelled to see one last movie there and get the inside scoop on what's next for the building that housed the longtime Eagan attraction. Upon arrival, I unexpectedly encountered a large group of friends and former theater coworkers who were also feeling nostalgic. It was a mini reunion, and seeing the inside gutted was surprisingly emotional. I spent a lot of my childhood under the roof of Eagan 16, and made many memories while working there. As I stood in the empty lobby, I couldn't help but feel sad knowing that would be the last time I see a movie at Regal Eagan.

Though the news of an Eagan closure may come as a surprise, the sale of Regal to British theater company Cineworld meant changes were likely inevitable. Cineworld was a smaller company than Regal at the time of purchase, and required a hefty $4 billion loan for the deal to go through. Given the money it owes, it makes sense that Cineworld decided to liquidate various Regal theaters. According to Regal's website, it appears that the fate of the Regal in Eagan is sealed, as Minnesota is no longer on its list of states with theater locations. This listing for the building at 2055 Cliff Road, which was updated just yesterday (4/18/19), confirms that building lease expired this month and hasn't been renewed. Though it appears the building's tenure as a Regal is finished, the news for theatergoers may not be all bad. It seems the building could be purchased by another theater company and the interior might even be getting an upgrade.

Before I watched my movie yesterday, I spent some time talking to my former Regal manager - who was working his final shift - about what comes next. Although the completion of a deal wasn't confirmed, he was optimistic that the building owners were in talks of selling the property to another theater company. Given the ideal location and the building already standing as a theater, it would seem that a purchase - and possibly interior renovations - is a possibility. Again, however, none of this information has been confirmed by Regal or the building owners. Though it will be under a new name, moviegoers can only hope the building has more years as a theater ahead.

To some, it may just be a building, but to others, it is a place filled with memories. No matter what happens, thank you to all of the kind staff who provided a positive theater experience at Regal throughout the last two decades. Thank you Regal, for being a piece of this community and a piece of my childhood.
Apr 20, 2019
regal_16.JPG
Eagan Regal Theatre to close 2019 Eagan Regal Cinemas 16 Closes After 20-Year Run

As what comes next for the property unfolds, local moviegoers will have to look toward neighboring cities to fulfill their viewing needs.
By Tyler Baillif, Neighbor | Apr 19, 2019 9:30 pm ET | Updated Apr 19, 2019 11:54 pm ET

Eagan moviegoers looking to see the epic conclusion of Avengers: Endgame in theaters next week will have to look toward neighboring cities to do so. After a more than 20-year run since it was built in 1998, Regal Cinemas 16 on Cliff Road is closed indefinitely. What comes next for the property however, may not be all bad for moviegoers.

Having previously worked at the theater, I learned through former coworkers that yesterday would be the final day its doors were open. The closure was so sudden, I felt compelled to see one last movie there and get the inside scoop on what's next for the building that housed the longtime Eagan attraction. Upon arrival, I unexpectedly encountered a large group of friends and former theater coworkers who were also feeling nostalgic. It was a mini reunion, and seeing the inside gutted was surprisingly emotional. I spent a lot of my childhood under the roof of Eagan 16, and made many memories while working there. As I stood in the empty lobby, I couldn't help but feel sad knowing that would be the last time I see a movie at Regal Eagan.

Though the news of an Eagan closure may come as a surprise, the sale of Regal to British theater company Cineworld meant changes were likely inevitable. Cineworld was a smaller company than Regal at the time of purchase, and required a hefty $4 billion loan for the deal to go through. Given the money it owes, it makes sense that Cineworld decided to liquidate various Regal theaters. According to Regal's website, it appears that the fate of the Regal in Eagan is sealed, as Minnesota is no longer on its list of states with theater locations. This listing for the building at 2055 Cliff Road, which was updated just yesterday (4/18/19), confirms that building lease expired this month and hasn't been renewed. Though it appears the building's tenure as a Regal is finished, the news for theatergoers may not be all bad. It seems the building could be purchased by another theater company and the interior might even be getting an upgrade.

Before I watched my movie yesterday, I spent some time talking to my former Regal manager - who was working his final shift - about what comes next. Although the completion of a deal wasn't confirmed, he was optimistic that the building owners were in talks of selling the property to another theater company. Given the ideal location and the building already standing as a theater, it would seem that a purchase - and possibly interior renovations - is a possibility. Again, however, none of this information has been confirmed by Regal or the building owners. Though it will be under a new name, moviegoers can only hope the building has more years as a theater ahead.

To some, it may just be a building, but to others, it is a place filled with memories. No matter what happens, thank you to all of the kind staff who provided a positive theater experience at Regal throughout the last two decades. Thank you Regal, for being a piece of this community and a piece of my childhood.
Apr 20, 2019
k9vest.jpg
Burnsville K-9 Jet 2019Burnsville K-9 Jet was awarded a “Healthcare for K9 Heroes” grant from Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. This 501c (3) nationwide charity, located in East Taunton, Mass, lives by the mission to provide bullet and stab protective vests and other assistance to dogs of law enforcement and related agencies throughout the United States. Photo compliments of the City of Burnsville.Apr 19, 2019
bowling_night.jpg
Dan Patch BowlBowling night in Savage, undated.Apr 19, 2019
Grade_3.jpg
Marion Savage schoolSavage Elementary Grade 3 1961/1962
Top row - Shirley Shelton - Marc Williams - Pam Miller - Dan Mott - Larry Maertens - Mary Leitchman - Steve Hopkins - Cynthia Gibe

2nd row - Kathy Turnquist - Bob Mastous - Mark Larson - Duane Hentz - Kathy Anderson - Donovan Scholta

3rd row - Linda Paterness - Lamont Rolfshus - Steve Broden - Nancy Rome - Mark Nechkash - Ronnie Rude - Coleen Gatslaff

4th row - Larry Falness - Debbie Drake - Margie Ryberg - Pam Schroeder - Robin Cooley - Judy Ross - Lee Fiinch
Apr 19, 2019
Grade_2.jpg
Marion Savage schoolSavage Elementary - 2nd Grade - 1960/1961
Top row - Larry Martens, Pam Miller, Steve Jason, Kathy Turnquist, Vern Greybill, Elizabeth Manhoney, Larry Falnes, Robin Cooley

2nd row - Pat Schidler, Mike Hynes, Gary Richardson - Nancy Galley, Steve Hopkins

3rd row - Roger Christopherson, Judy Ross, Mark Nechkash, Mary Leitchman, Pat McKinney, Pam Schroeder, Peter Cameron, ?

4th row - Nancy Rome, Dan Mott, Coleen Gatslaff- Scott Terwilliger, Patty Schunk , John Kruger, Linda Paterness, Dave Anderson
Apr 19, 2019
panelite.pdf
Panelite - Burnsville Performing Arts Center projectPanelite outlines their role in the construction of what is now the Ames Center.

Challenge / Intent

To enliven the exterior and clearly define the entrance of the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, using a series of luminous, directionally transparent glass columns that can vary in color depending on time of day, type of performance, or aesthetic intent.
Solution

Akeny Kell Architects chose Panelite’s exterior-grade ClearShade IGU because its proprietary tubular honeycomb core allows not only visual transparency but also the subtle and complex visual effects they sought to create with color. The transparent glass lites of the ClearShade units create directional views for patrons entering the building, and the color-changing LED fixtures located inside the columns at the base of the units wash the honeycomb core to create varying visual effects.
To give the columns a more minimal aesthetic and further
emphasize their visual “lightness”, Panelite produced the units with a stepped glazing detail at the corners.

The ClearShade units carry a 10-year warranty and provide a low maintenance surface for long-term durability even in the hard Minnesota winters. Framing System and Installation supplied by Top Lite Glazing Contractors.
Environmental Facts

Panelite ClearShade IGUs, when used for vertical or skylight glazing, can reduce Solar Heat Gain by 75% while maintaining 48% Visible Light Transmission, reducing energy consumption and costs, and improving user comfort. (SHGC = 0.18 at mid-day.)

ClearShade units are produced in New Jersey, Indiana, Florida and California, often falling within the 500-mile radius required by LEED to qualify for “Regional Materials” credit.

Panelite materials also contribute to LEED credits for Daylighting and Views, and Innovation and Design.
Apr 19, 2019
VIDEO_DISPLAY.pdf
Burnsville will be latest high school to have video display scoreboardMay 5, 2014 - Burnsville High School will be the latest metro area school to install a video display scoreboard, a move they say will allow them to host more sporting events, bring in sponsorship dollars and let kids learn about video production...Apr 19, 2019
virgil22.jpg
Virgil Gehring 2013Former Burnsville High School teacher of 23 years, Virgil Gehring.Apr 19, 2019
virgil~0.pdf
Virgil Gehring 2013Virgil Gehring, age 82 of Eagan died June 16, 2013. He taught 23 years in Burnsville.Apr 19, 2019
stop_bank.pdf
Suit would halt Burnsville bank 1971April 15, 1971 Dakota County Tribune reports on the efforts of the Savage State Bank to forestall the establishment of the recently approved Burnsville State Bank. The Savage bank claims the area was not yet in need of another full service bank...Apr 18, 2019
trump_to_burnsville.pdf
Donald Trump's Burnsville visit runs smoothly 2019The Savage Pacer, April 16, 2019 reports on President Donald Trumps visit to Burnsville at Nuss Truck and Equipment on April 15, 2019.Apr 18, 2019
police_retires.pdf
Burnsville Police Chief Bob Hawkins to retire in December 2012An August 4, 2012 online Patch news post reports on the planned retirement of Chief Bob Hawkins.Apr 18, 2019
The_Minneapolis_Star_Thu__Mar_28__1974_.jpg
Lucky Twin Movie Theatre 1974Job opening at the Lucky Twin for a manager - March 28, 1974 MInneapolis Star Tribune classifieds.Apr 17, 2019
Timberland_Knolls___Dec_6__1964_~0.jpg
Timberland KnollsTimberland Knolls ad - December 6, 1964 Minneapolis Star Tribune.Apr 17, 2019
blacktop_to_space.pdf
Turning blacktop into greenbacks 2007August 1, 2007 Minneapolis Star Tribune story describes how Building on parking lots, Burnsville has relaxed its parking regulations to make room for redevelopment.Apr 16, 2019
bville_center_success.pdf
Burnsville Center writing a south of the river success story 2006September 20, 2006 Minneapolis Star Tribune: Approaching its 30th anniversary, the mall is as strong as it has ever been. The 1.1 million square foot shopping center completed a $13 million expansion in April and its 99% occupied...Apr 16, 2019
river_hills_ads.jpg
Pemtom ad for River HillsCover of a 1960s brochure for River Hills.Apr 16, 2019
barton_full_story.pdf
Linda Barton - city manager counts on teamwork to run Burnsville 1985Minneapolis Star Tribune June 13, 1985 article features Linda Barton, Burnsville's new city manager.Apr 16, 2019
Bloomquist_hardware.pdf
Bloomquist Hardware continues family service 1994Burnsville Current - September 17, 1984 features Bloomquist Hardware's story.Apr 16, 2019
1979_coucnil.pdf
Burnsville City Council begins new year 1979.January 11, 1979 Dakota County Tribune photo of Burnsville's City Council and key City staff. Front left to right - bottom -Warren Kelley, Paul Hoover, Mayor Paul Scheunemann, Connie Morrison and James Pappathatos.

In the back row - Ralph Clover Park Director, Mike DuMoulin Public Safety Director, Charles Siggerud City Engineer, Glen Northrup City Manager, Mike Falk City Planner and Les Anderson - City Clerk.
Apr 16, 2019
13373 files on 446 page(s) 1