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Home > Neighboring Towns > Savage(formerly Hamilton), Lakeville and Shakopee Minnesota

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Savage BridgeMay 18, 1913 Minneapolis Star Tribune - $50,000 steel draw bridge across the Minnesota River at Savage to Bloomington. Built and owned by the Dan Patch Electric Railroad.
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Savage BridgeMay 18, 1913 Minneapolis Star Tribune - profile of the Savage Bridge.
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Savage BridgeSeptember 19, 1967 view of the Savage Bridge, Minneapolis Star Tribune.
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Savage bridge approach to be rebuilt 1968June 13, 1968 Dakota County Tribune:

Plans are now being designed for a new south approach to the Savage Bridge across the Minnesota River...
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Savage BridgeSavage Bridge and map showing location - September 20, 1977 Mpls Star Tribune.
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Bring the depot home- Spring 2005Efforts begin to return the Savage Depot from Murphy's Landing to downtown Savage.
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Friends in downtown SavageBruce McCall, Elroy Hennen, Don Egan, Don Hanson. - undated photo.
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Men about town 1988In the Savage Review- January 1988 Del Stelling writes a story about life in Savage in the 1940s remembering men such as
Alvin Bagge, Jim McDonald, Frank McCann, Tony Egan, Bob Riley, Clarence Stevens and Herbie Pilger.
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The Buffalo TapSide view of the Buffalo Tap, long time Savage bar and restaurant.
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The Buffalo TapThe Buffalo Tap, long time Savage bar and restaurant.
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The Buffalo TapThe Buffalo tap interior, Savage.
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Buffalo Tap and GrillLocated at 4990 W 123rd Street, it has operated for many years. Once known as Earl and Dorothy's.
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The Buffalo TapThe Buffalo Tap, downtown Savage on the bank of Credit River.
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The Buffalo TapSide front view of the Buffalo Tap, long time Savage bar and restaurant.
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Savage Library - Heritage Artwork Within the Savage Library is the Heritage Room established as a joint partnership between the library system, the City of Savage and the Dan Patch Historical Society in 1997. Throughout the building you will find art depicting Dan Patch, Savage and Scott County History. Shown is a wooden recreation of the Hanging "Burial" Tree.
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Burnsville author tackles Savage HistoryNancy Huddleston of Burnsville was the author of a 127 page book in the Images of America series which is described as a comprehensive history of the period from 1852, when the community began as Hamilton's Landing to 1965 when dikes were built to contain the flood of the century.
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Burnsville Pointe Apartments 2020Burnsville Pointe apartments on the border of Burnsville and Savage. 3809 Sibley Street.
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The Buffalo TapThe Buffalo Tap, downtown Savage, long time popular bar restaurant.
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Savage Butcher ShopThe February 1990 Savage Review provides a brief history of the Savage Butcher shop. The name of the butcher is unknown.
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Warren Butler Park SavageThe 26-acre park is named after Warren Butler, a sergeant in the Army who was killed in action in India in World War II in January of 1944 at the age of 23. He grew up in Savage, attended Bloomington High School and graduated from the University of Minnesota, before joining the Army.

Butler was the first Scott County soldier to earn the Gold Star for his military service in WW II.

The park is one of Savage’s oldest and perhaps one the most used. It has four youth softball/baseball fields, a tennis court and an ice skating area with warming house.The playground area, behind Marion W. Savage Elementary School, gets used year-round, including during the school year by students enjoying recess.

Pacer Field is used by adult baseball leagues, as well as by the Savage American Legion baseball team.

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Warren Butler plaque 2018The park is one of Savage’s oldest and perhaps one the most used. It has four youth softball/baseball fields, a tennis court and an ice skating area with warming house.The playground area, behind Marion W. Savage Elementary School, gets used year-round, including during the school year by students enjoying recess.

Pacer Field is used by adult baseball leagues, as well as by the Savage American Legion baseball team.
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William Campbell, Hamilton 1891Savage was then Hamilton, at the time of this November 1, 1891 St. Paul Globe Ad. I am prepared to winter 50 horses on my farm, best of care. Wm Campbell, Hamilton Station, Scott County, Minnesota.

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Camp SavageCamp Savage Nisei soldiers Japanese Language Training Camp - year unknown
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Camp SavageCamp Savage, photo compliments of the City of Savage.
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Camp SavageCamp Savage, compliments of the City of Savage.
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Camp Savage plaqueCamp Savage is the former site of a Military Intelligence Service language school operating during World War II. The school itself was established in San Francisco, but was moved in 1942 to Savage, Minnesota in the interest of national security. The purpose of the school was to teach the Japanese language to American soldiers. This skill could then be used to translate captured documentation and aid the American war effort. The program was later moved to Fort Snelling in St. Paul, Minnesota. Camp Savage is the founding school of the Defense Language Institute.
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From Hamilton to SavageThere are very few newspaper references to the name change of Hamilton to Savage in 1904. This January 4, 1963, Minneapolis Tribune article published, when the Savage mansion was torn down in Minneapolis, references it.
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Lake Marion, Prairie LakeThe original name of Lake Marion, Lakeville was Prairie Lake.
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Marion Savage The owner of Dan Patch established his stables in Hamilton. Because of the popularity and successs of Dan Patch the town was renamed Savage in recognition of Marion W. Savage.
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Photo of Cargill ship 2017 article
Sept. 7 marks Cargill ship construction anniversary in Savage

By Britt Johnsen bjohnsen@swpub.com Sep 7, 2017

Sept. 7 marks an important anniversary in Savage.

It’s the 75th anniversary of when construction began on the first ship built at Port Cargill.

It was 1942. Less than a year earlier, on Dec. 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor was attacked. Within just 60 days of the attack, the U.S. Navy asked Cargill Corp. leaders for a meeting in Washington D.C., according to archive files provided by Cargill. The Navy wanted to know if Cargill could build tankers.

The answer was, in short, yes.

About 3,000 people worked at the company at the time, said Lisa Brickey, warehouse manager for Mosaic Crop Nutrition, a fertilizer company that Cargill partly owns. Brickey also happens to be fascinated by Cargill history.

It was an ambitious project, but Cargill wanted to help with World War II efforts, according to Cargill files. However, it didn’t even have a shipyard. They located a farm in Savage — the grandparents of current Mosaic employee Nancy Westphal of Savage — and bought the land. That’s how Port Cargill was born, Cargill files show.

Cargill got a contract to build six gasoline tankers for the U.S. Navy, all named after rivers and mostly Native American names.

The first two on which construction began in Sept. 7, 1942, were Agawam and Elkhorn. By the end of that month, construction had begun on four other tankers.

As is true to hearty Minnesota style, construction on these tankers continued on, despite the air falling to 20 to 35 below zero, according to Cargill files.

All the while, Cargill was making a name for itself in the ship-making business. That same fall, a naval officer from the Bureau of Ships came to check out the company’s ability to to make more ships. And the Defense Plant Corporation made Cargill a candidate for construction of a “powerful towboat” for the lower Mississippi.

By the time the war ended, four such “powerful towboats” were made and so were 18 tankers. Each tanker was 310 feet long and capable of carrying 600,000 gallons of gasoline, according to Cargill files.

“Understanding where we come from… is something that really is a part of Cargill,” said April Nelson, a spokeswoman for the company.
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