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First signs for Ridges Complex1975 these signs appeared at what is now the intersection of Nicollet and McAndrews Road, announcing the Ridges.
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Works begin on the area for the RidgesInitial work in the area that will house Fairview Ridges Hospital and other Ridges services.
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Fairview Ridges 1984Opened in May of 1984 Fairview Ridges has grown to the premier hospital south of the river and hub around which the Burnsville Medical Alliance cluster was formed. Fairview Ridges has consistently expanded during its first 25 years evidenced by the opening of its new “cath lab” in January of 2009. Fairview Ridges currently employees over 1400 and continues to grow.
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Fairview Ridges 1984Opened in May of 1984 Fairview Ridges has grown to the premier hospital south of the river and hub around which the Burnsville Medical Alliance cluster was formed. Fairview Ridges has consistently expanded during its first 25 years evidenced by the opening of its new “cath lab” in January of 2009. Fairview Ridges currently employees over 1400 and continues to grow.
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Fairview Ridges HospitalThe Burnsville Current captures the arrival of the first patient at the newly opened hospital.
ad_for_ridges.pdf
Ad for the RidgesThe long awaited Ridges project is moving steadily forward toward reality. The 140 acre site is ready for the first construction phase...
Ridges Phase 1 will include - Prince of Peace Church, Private medical/dental clinic and a nursing home facility, with final construction completed in the mid 80s.
Ebenezer_Ridges_time_capsule_2017.pdf
Time capsule marks more than 40 years of senior care 2017The August 4, 2017 edition of the Burnsville Sun/Thisweek News reports on the creation of a time capsule by Ebenezer Ridges Center Center, which opened in 1973.
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Exterior Fairview Ridges Hospital 2017According to their website: Fairview Ridges Hospital has been providing scare to residents of the Minnesota River Valley since 1984. As the southern metro area's largest hospital, our highly-trained specialists provide quality care and excellent service to patients.
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Fairview Ridges Hospital 2017Another view of the Fairview Ridges Hospital.
Fairview_Ridges_-_Another_Foe_1982.pdf
Fairview Ridges - Another Foe 1982May 6, 1982 DCTribune

By GARY KUBAT Staff Writer
BURNSVILLE
November, triumphant remarks filled the air as ground was broken for the new Fairview Ridges Hospital, following years of struggle to locate a hospital in Burnsville.
But the battle isn’t over. No longer tangling with the Metro­politan Health Board or the Met­ropolitan Council, Fairview Com­munity Hospitals has en­countered a new foe - the economy.
Construction of the 150-bed hospital, slated to open in January, 1984, has been delayed due to a depressed bond market. Bruce Haskin, administrator of
the future hospital, detailed a new proposal for financing the hospital to the Burnsville City Council at its meeting Monday, May 3.
During the certificate of need application process, Haskin told the council, the interest rate was about 11%. Since that time, the rate has gone as high as 14'2%, with the present rate at about 13%, he added.

By recycling space in the ex­isting Ridges Medical Center, the amount of money needed for the hospital was reduced to $33 million. The figure used during the certificate of need application process was $36 million while the council granted Fairview up to $38 million in tax-exempt financ­ing at its meeting Jan. 18.
The $33 million figure includes construction and capital equip­ment costs, architectural and other professional fees as well as financing costs, but not interest costs.
The concept of financing, Haskin explained to the council, is known as zero coupon or deep
discount and was recently used to finance Akron General Hospital in Akron, OH.
“It is a. bold new concept,” Haskin stated. Instead of issuing $33 million in bonds, $100 million in bonds would be issued under the proposal. The amount is sized to include both principal and 30 years worth of interest. The ac­ tual selling price would be just the principal amount, $33 million.
Under traditional financing methods, investors would have to clip coupons every six months to receive an interest payment. In order to receive “a true return,” they would then have to invest that money in a similar or better vehicle.
W’ith the proposed concept, in­vestors would receive all prin­ cipal with interest in one lump sum at the end of 30 years (or whatever amount of time they specify). Bonds would be issued in$5,000denominations.
By using this financing con­ cept, Haskin commented, both the hospital and investors would benefit. Fairview would benefit because the interest rate would be up to one-and-a-half points lower. That would result in an
estimated savings ot $495,000 per year every year, lower patient care costs.
For investors, he continued, the concept is attractive because in­ terest can be deferred up to 30 years (most likely after retire* ment when one is in a lower tax bracket), the interest rate is guaranteed and interest com­ pounds. This financing concept also saves the investor from clip­ ping coupons and reinvesting, Haskin noted.
The council set Tuesday, May 25, at 6:30 p.m. as a public hear­ ing to consider the concept.
It was an “ 11th hour” proposal, Haskin admitted, and said more information would be available at the hearing. “The fact that it could result in significant saving? to the patient prompted us to seek your consideration.” he said.
If the council does not approve the new financing concept, the hospital will be financed in a con­ ventional manner, Haskin stated.
Because of the delays, the opening of Fairview Ridges Hospital is expected to be postponed until the spring of 1
Fairview_Ridges_2012_guide.pdf
Fairview Ridges information 2012The Sun This Week News published a Burnsville Guide in 2012 including information on the Fairview Ridges Hospital.
fairview_ridges_2017.pdf
Fairview Ridges opened in 1984 (2017)Information published in the Burnsville Sun/This Week News Burnsville Community Guide 2017.

Fairview Ridges Hospital is known for outstanding emergency, surgery, cardiovascular,orthopedic, cancer and pediatric care. Its birth place delivers more than 2,500 babies each year and has a Level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

The 150-bed facility is one of the largest employers in Burnsville and is the first hospital in Minnesota to be named a Center of Excellence for Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery by the American Institute of Minimally Invasive Surgery. The hospital also provides access to research and innovations in health care at University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview, and University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital.

Fairview Ridges recently underwent its largest expansion since opening its doors in 1984. The expansion includes a new state-of-the-art Specialty Care Center that is home to a heart, cancer
and orthopedic centers, an imaging center,cardiac rehabilitation, oncology, musculoskeleta lservices, a pharmacy and a home medical equipment store. Improvements to the existing
hospital building include a new laboratory, a refurbished pediatric unit with larger rooms, anew orthopedic spine unit and an observation/outpatient unit.

Hospital officials say refurbished pediatric unit enhances the patient and family experience in a healing, kid-friendly environment. The new space features animal themes, bright colors and spacious, family-friendly rooms.
Fairview_Ridges_new_financing_concept_1982.pdf
Fairview Ridges new financing concept 1982Fairview Ridges cites new financing concept
Burnsville SUN May 10, 1982

A bold new concept for financing the Fairview Ridges Hospital was outlined in Burnsville last week.
Bruce Haskin, administrator of the new Fairview Ridges, ex plained the proposal at last week’s meeting of the Burnsville City Council.
Haskin noted the construction of the 150-bed hospital has been delayed because of a depressed bond market.
He said that during the certificate of need application process the interest rate was about 11percent.
Since that time,however, the rate has gone as high as 14 and a half percent, with the present rate at about 13 percent.
Haskin said the amount of money needed for construction of the new hospital has been reduced to $33 million, as a result of recycling space in the existing Ridges Medi cal Center.
During the certificate of need application process, it was estimated the new hospital would cost $36 million.

The Burnsville City Council, at its meeting on January 18, authorized up to $38 million in tax-exempt financing for the new hospital.
Included in the $33 million figure are construction and capital equipment costs, architectural and other professional fees, as well as financing costs.
In explaining the new financing concept, Haskin said it is known as zero coupon or deep discount financing, similar to that used to finance Akron General Hospital in Akron, Ohio.
Under the new financing concept. Haskin said. $100 million in bonds would be issued, rather than $33 million as originally proposed.
He said the amount is sized to include both principal and 30years worth of interest, with the actual selling price being the principal
amount of $33million.
Investors, under the proposed financing concept, would receive all principal with interest in one lump sum at the end of 30 years, or whatever amount of time they spec ify-
Bonds would be issued in de nominations of $5,000.
Traditional financing methods, on the other hand, provide that investors clip coupons each six months to receive an interest payment.
According to Haskin, both the hospital and the investor would benefit under the new financing concept.
Fairview Community Hospitals, he pointed out, would benefit from an interest rate that would be up to one-and-a-half points lower, resulting in an estimated savings of $495,000 per year.
Investors, on the other hand, would benefit from the fact that interest can be deferred up to 30 years, the interest rate is guaranteed, and interest compounds.
In addition, the investor would be saved the necessity of clipping coupons and reinvesting.
The estimated savings of $495,000 per year would also result in lower patient care costs, Haskin said.
This fact, he said, prompted the hospital to seek the new financing concept.
A public hearing to consider the new financing concept will be con ducted by the Burnsville City Council at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 25.-
fairview_ridges_senior_companions.pdf
Fairview Ridges Senior Companion Health Coach 2017Burnsville based Fairview Ridges and Lutheran Social Services offer a program where volunteers assist Fairview Ridges patients.
Ground_Finally_Broken.pdf
Ground Finally Broken for new Ridges Hospital Nov 1981November 18, 1981
Burnsville SUN
By DEL STELLING
In the words of one of the pro gram participants, Monday, November 9,1971, was an historic day for Burnsville and the Fairview Community Hospitals.
The occasion for the remarks was the groundbreaking ceremonies for the Fairview Ridges Hospital, which will be located on the Ridges campus in Burnsville.
Several hundred area residents joined state and local officials in the groundbreaking ceremonies.
Carl Platou, president of Fair- view Community Hospitals, noted that it was ten years ago, “almost to the week," that Fairview officials heard about the property, which at the time was in receivership.
Subsequently, Fairview Community Hospitals purchased the property under a court-approved settlement.
Platou further noted that for the past four years Fairview officials
have been engaged in the lengthy planning process leading to the final approval of the required certificate of need.
He thanked all those who sup ported the project over the past couple of years, saying, “It’s a very meaningful thing for all of us.”
In his remarks, Governor Al Quie noted that he had participated in the groundbreaking for the original Ridges home for the elderly, some 15or more years ago. At the time, he was serving as 1st District Congressman.
Commenting further, Quie said, “This is a thrilling moment and I’m glad to be part of it."
Mayor Paul Scheunemann stated he was excited “to see this coming to a fruition.”
In a joking manner, he said, “We had a building permit ready to deliver a couple of years ago.”
Lloyd 0. Swanson, chairman of the Fairview Board of Trustees,
cited the importance of the new hospital to the communities located south of the Minnesota River, add ing “November 9 is going to go down as one of the great days in the history of Fairview Hospitals.”
Swanson also welcomed the fact that Minneapolis Children’s Health Center would be participating in the new hospital.
Others participating in the groundbreaking ceremony were former Governor Elmer Andersen, State Senator Howard Knutson, State Rep. Chuck Halberg, State Rep. Carolyn Rodriguez, Father Donald Burns, pastor of Mary, Mother of the Church; the Rev. Merv Thompson, pastor of Prince of Peace Lutheran Church; and Bruce Haskin, director of Ridges Development for Fairview.
According to Haskin, it will take about two years to construct the 150-bed hospital, with completion expected in early 1984.
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Exterior sign at Fairview Ridges HospitalTwo sided sign at the main entry to the hospital. Reverse of sign includes RED EMERGENCY on the signage. Photo 2017
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Park Nicollet Clinic 2017Park Nicollet Clinic—14000 Fairview Drive is located near the Ridges.
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Plans for the Ridges CampusMap showing future location of a hospital, nursing home, other medical services and Prince of Peace Lutheran Church on what would become the Ridges Campus.
Residents_Voice_Support_1981.pdf
Residents voice support for new hospital proposal 1981September 15, 1981
Burnsville SUN
By DEL STERLING
A standing-room-only crowd of area residents turned out last week to demonstrate their support for the proposal of Fair view Community Hospitals to construct a new hospital in Burnsville.
The public hearing, conducted by the Metropolitan Health Board, w-as held in the cafeteria of Burnsville Senior High School and lasted for about four hours.
Bruce Haskin, Fairview’s project director, outlined plans for the pro posed $26.7 million project, which, if approved, could be completed by the middle of 1983.
The 150bed hospital, he said, would be a full service secondary medical facility serving 11 communities south of the Minnesota River, representing the fastest-growing area of the seven-county metropolitan district.
Commenting on future development of the Ridges site, Haskin noted that officials of the YMCA have announced plans to construct a new Minnesota Valley Branch facility at the Ridges.
He further noted that Minneapolis Children’s Health Center has reached an agreement with Fair- view' Community Hospitals to lease 20 beds of the new hospital for pediatric care.
Haskin described the proposed facility as a family-oriented hospital which will concentrate on acute
care patients.
Rat Harder, director of planning for Fairview Community Hospitals, said there were two basic needs for a new hospital in Burnsville — population growth and increased industrial development.
She also stated no single hospital in the area would be harmed by the Burnsville hospital proposal.
Opposition to the proposal, how ever, was voiced by representatives of Sanford Memorial Hospital in Farmington and St. Francis Hospital in Shakopee.
The Sanford Hospital representative said little has changed since 1979 to warrant approval of the project at this time, adding that a hospital at the Ridges site “is not justified at this time.”
The spokesman for St. Francis Hospital, noting that plans are being made to expand facilities there, said the proposed hospital in Burnsville would adversely affect St. Francis Hospital.
Most of those speaking at the public hearing, however voiced their approval of the project.
Dr. Jack Hubbard, a resident of Burnsville for four years, cited the hospital needs of the community and urged the Health Board “to press for immediate approval.”
Former Gov Elmer Andersen, publisher of Sun Newspapers, again spoke in support of the Fairview hospital proposal.
“1don't know how anyone could objectively review the population figures and not realize that Burnsville needs a hospital,”he said.
He cited the cooperation of Fair- view and Children’s Health Center in the proposed project, and urged “united, favorable concensus”of the Health Board for the hospital proposal.
Mayor Paul Scheunemann, speaking in support of the project, said: “Free enterprise wants to give us a hospital. I respectfully request that you give them a chance.”
Mayor Bea Blomquist of Eagan voiced similar support for the proposal, noting that the Eagan City Council had adopted a resolution supporting the hospital plan.
State Senator Howard Knutson and State Rep. Chuck Halberg, both residents of Burnsville, voiced their support for the Board.
Fred Moors, an official of North western Bank Southwest and a Burnsville resident for 14 years, cited the growth of the Ridges campus.
“The citizens are here to show their support,”he said.
Others speaking in support of the project were Father Donald Burns, the Rev. Merv Thompson, Tom Blackmar of the YMCA, Bill Shiebler, Mike Larkin, Dr. Bernie O’Neill, and David Ziegenhagen.
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Exterior signage at Fairview Ridges Hospital2017 sign in front of the Burnsville Hospital, 201 E Nicollet Blvd.

According to their website: Fairview Ridges Hospital has been providing state-of-the-art care to residents of the Minnesota River Valley since 1984. As the southern metro area's largest hospital, our highly-trained specialists provide quality care and excellent service to patients.
       
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