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2011_2012_community_resources.pdf
2011 - 2012 City of Burnsville Residents GuidePages 24 and 25 feature resources for residents such as: Phone numbers for City Departments, Contact information for Telephone, Gas, Cable, electric and recycling and sanitation. Also, the Library, Services for seniors, 360 Communities, the Chamber of Commerce and the Convention and Visitors Bureau.
2011_2012_cover.pdf
2011 - 2012 City of Burnsville Residents GuideThe cover page of the 2011 - 2012 City of Burnsville Residents Guide.
2011_2012_fun_and_community_events.pdf
2011 - 2012 City of Burnsville Residents GuidePages 22 and 23 of the Guide feature - Fun for everyone - Art (Performing Arts Center), Family Fun (Parks, beach, movies, Skateville), Snow (Buck Hill), One stop shop (Burnsville Center), Food (More than 100 restaurants) and a list of Community events including: Friday Night Flicks, Rockin' Lunch hour concerts, Wednesday in the Park, Firemuster, International Festival and more.
2011_2012_index_and_welcome.pdf
2011 - 2012 City of Burnsville Residents GuidePage 5 and 6 of the Guide: A page idex of topics covered in the 2011 - 2012 Guide and a Welcome from Mayor Elizabeth Kautz and council members Mary Sherry, Dan Gustafson and Dan Kealey.
2011_2012_living_in_burnsville.pdf
2011 - 2012 City of Burnsville Residents GuidePage 11 of the Community Guide - offers resource information for residents and a list of the top 10 code violations, which could occur.
2011_2012_recreation.pdf
2011 - 2012 City of Burnsville Residents GuidePages 12 and 13 of the Guide address recreational facilities including: Alimagnet Dog Park, Burnsville Ice Center, The GARAGE youth center, Birnamwood Golf Course, Youth Activities, Adult and Senior programs and how to volunteer.
2017_cover_Burnsville_Community_Guide.pdf
Burnsville Community Guide 2017Front cover of the 2017 Burnsville Community Guide produced by the Burnsville Sun/This Week News.
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Burnsville Fire Muster 2017Page 32 - In the Experience Burnsville's 30th Anniversary booklet, they highlight the Fire Muster. Experience Burnsville is the theme of the Burnsville Convention and Visitors Bureau.
Bicentennial_garden_not_forgotten.pdf
Bicentennial Garden Not forgotten 2015 (2 pages)In a Sun This Week News article, August 20, 2015 - Chuck and Charlotte Bock and Len and Mimi Nachman tell the story behind the creation of the Bicentennial Garden in 1976 and the planned upgrades in 2015.
Bill_Ganz_food_shelf_volunteer_2013.pdf
Bill Ganz, age 75 irreplaceable volunteer at food shelf 2013The Burnsville Sun/ThisWeek News October 17, 2013 reports how Bill Ganz volunteers with the 360 Communities Food Shelf program, at least 28 hours a week.
Burnsville_area_attractions_2012_guide.pdf
Burnsville Area filled with attractions 2012The Burnsville area is home to several attractions that make it a destination to people in the south metro, the region and beyond.
One of the busiest venues around is the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, which opened near the Heart of the City in January 2009.

Other events include the Fire Muster, Art and All that Jazz and Wednesdays in the Park.
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Monument signs at the entrance to the cityThe first new welcome sign was placed on Highway 13 at the border of Eagan and Burnsville.
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Burnsville by winter 2016A photo of a Burnsville Winter - compliments of the City of Burnsville.
bville17.pdf
Map of Burnsville 2017This map shows parks and names of schools in Burnsville.
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Ridges Care Campus 2017Ebenezer Ridges Campus. This award-winning community offers skilled nursing, assisted living, memory care, transitional care, adult day and intergenerational care all on the same campus.

From independent living and assisted living, to memory care adult day care and skilled nursing care for short and long term stays, Ebenezer Ridges Campus has everything seniors need to make their living situations more independent, healthful and meaningful. A truly unique senior community, Ebenezer Ridges Campus buildings are each connected, which allows access to lounge areas, a chapel, a coffee shop, a gift shop and a beauty/barber shop.
Chancellor_Manor_Makeover_2010.pdf
Chancellor Manor Makeover 2010More than a makeover at Burnsville's Chancellor Manor
A remade public housing complex in Burnsville means more services for residents - and fewer police calls. By ALEX EBERT Star Tribune AUGUST 28, 2010 — 10:13PM
ELIZABETH FLORES, STAR TRIBUNE
Children played soccer outside a newly renovated courtyard at the Chancellor Manor pubic housing development. Since the renovation, calls to police have fallen dramatically.
Fresh paint, winding concrete walkways and neatly manicured trees make the apartments and townhouses of Chancellor Manor look more like college dorms than Dakota County's largest subsidized housing development. Yet after a yearlong renovation, people say the biggest change is something you can't see: Not nearly as much crime.
After a
Officials of the city of Burnsville and the county also praise the development's higher curbside appeal, which might yield higher property values in the surrounding area.
The 14-building complex with three-story apartments and two-story townhouses is located near County Rd. 42 and the Burnsville Center.
It was built in 1972 to accommodate federal Section 8 housing vouchers. Most residents are non-English speaking immigrants whose salaries average about $13,000 a year, said Dick Brustad, vice president of the Community Housing Development Corporation, which owns the property.
In the last three decades the "tired and worn-out" property's care started to slide and crime became a serious issue with "less than aggressive oversight," said Mark Ulfers , executive director of the Dakota County Community Development Agency.
management switch -- and more than $24 million from various government and private entities -- the 500 residents are seeing better security, central air and community programming such as English and cooking classes.
Marsha White, center, was surrounded with a hug by her daughters, from left, Kayla White, 16, Krista White, 19, Lexi Wesley, 12, inside their townhouse.
White said that her home has new lighting
fixtures, new central air and new light
fixtures.
Marsha White, center, was surrounded with a hug by her daughters, from left, Kayla
White, 16, Krista White, 19, Lexi Wesley, 12, inside their townhouse. White said that her
home has new lighting fixtures, new central air and new light fixtures.
More
In 2000, Burnsville police received around 600 calls for service from the complex. Drug deals and gang graffiti were commonplace. A man was stabbed to death outside of an
apartment in 2003. A few years later, a man cut himself on the glass of a fire extinguisher box, spilling blood in an apartment and creating an uproar as residents called for improvements.
Fearing the federal government could pull money from the property, Dakota County, US Bank, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development raised enough funds for the private non-profit Community Housing and Development Corp. to buy the 200-unit complex and give it a security and aesthetic makeover.
Cue dozens of security camera installations, reinforced doors with heavy deadbolt locks and magnetic keys and newly unattached garages so residents and police can see clearly what happens in the parking lots.
The result: police calls for service plummeted 32 percent this year. Calls are down to 183 from 272 during the same period last year, said Burnsville Police Officer Casey Buck.
"Since new management came in, typical calls are similar to what you'd see at any apartment complex," Buck said.
And the renovated Chancellor Manor offers more for its residents that have less. English and cooking lessons. Boy Scout meetings. Grade school tutors. It's a "reinvigoration" of services the complex hasn't seen in ages, Ulfers said. Dakota County also opened up 10 units for homeless residents.
The property was scheduled for reassessment last Thursday, and politicians and administrators are speculating that the improved "curbside appeal" and increased safety could lead to higher property values around the once- troubled development.
Although the outcome appears to be rosy, changing was also a big inconvenience said Marsha White, a 10-year resident.
Since the structures were revamped without moving tenants, White let builders into her home as early as 7 a.m. some days to knock out a moldy wall and install new faucets and alarm systems.
Initially, residents were skeptical about the renovations.
There had been minor improvements over the last decade, but none really seemed to make a big difference, White said. But this time seemed like a real change to her.
"This is a 180," she said. "Just because you live in subsidized housing doesn't mean you have to let it go to hell."
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Burnsville WinterA winter photo at the Heart of the City - circa 2016 - Compliments of the City of Burnsville.
cover_2012_guide.pdf
Random Burnsville photos appearing on the 2012 Community DirectoryThe Burnsville Sun/This Week News publishes a yearly Burnsville Community Guide. This is the cover of the 2012 directory.
Delmoro_One_Man_Committee.pdf
Holiday Lighting - Ed Delmoroby John Gessner Thisweek Newspapers
After a dozen years as Burnsville’s one-man committee to raise funds for holiday lighting in the Heart of the City, Ed Delmoro still greets each season like a child waiting to pounce on Christmas morning.
“Every year I’m like a little kid,”said Delmoro,76. “Every year I get excited again: ‘It’s time to get the lights going again.’”
Delmoro’s work will brighten the Heart of the City again beginning Nov. 24, the night before Thanksgiving, when tree lights and decorative snowflakes are switched on during an annual holiday lighting ceremony.
Between the snowflake sponsorships and contributions for tree lights, Delmoro said he raises about $37,000 as vice president of winter lighting for the nonprofit Burnsville Community Foundation.
“We’ve pretty much got the Heart of the City decked out,”said Delmoro,a Burnsville resident since 1982. “What I like is that it’s seen as a community thing. I have over 60 sponsors that are not in the Heart of the City — they’re businesses down on (County Road) 42 or elsewhere in the city, which tells me that it really is a city event.”
A retired vice president of sales for Soo Line Railroad, Delmoro was serving on Burnsville’s Heart of the City Steering Committee in 1998 when the holiday lighting program was born.

The citizen group secured donated lights from Target and decorated a large pine tree at the Nicollet Avenue entrance to Civic Center Park.
The following year Delmoro expanded his sights to the newly streetscaped Burnsville Parkway. At the time, there was still an empty gas station and an empty Kmart store on land in the Heart of the City that has since been redeveloped, Delmoro said.
“I wouldn’t say it was blighted, but it needed renewal,”he said. The Heart of the City committee arranged for Saturday-morning visits from the St. Paul Farmers Market beginning in 1999.

“That was the summer draw,”said Delmoro, who pictured holiday lighting program as the winter attraction.
In September 1999 Delmoro opened his Burnsville Chamber of Commerce directory and began cold-calling to raise funds for the lighting program.
“I thought, ‘You know what? I’ve been a salesman all my life. If they hang up on me or slam the door in my face, I’m used to that.’It was just the opposite.”
Delmoro raised enough money to light the trees along Burnsville Parkway from Aldrich Avenue to Nicollet Avenue.
In 2000 he began selling snowflakes to decorate the lightposts in the newly streetscaped Heart of the City. The lighted flakes are about 40 inches around. Attached to the blue “Burnsville”banners on the lightposts are smaller banners carrying the name of the post’s snowflake sponsor.
About 200 of the roughly 225 posts in the Heart of the City are sold, many to families, Delmoro said. Sponsors make a one-time contribution of $250.
“The snowflakes are sponsored for a three-year period,”Delmoro said. “We’re now on our fourth crankover of that program, which will take it through 2011. And that’s been good. People adopt their snowflake, and they become very possessive of it.”
At renewal time, many sponsors wouldn’t think of letting another sponsor take their adopted pole, Delmoro said. Sponsors get to pick their poles from the available supply.
“I can pretty well drive through the Heart of the City and call out names,”Delmoro said. “I know which pole belongs with which person.”
LED lights are now used for the holiday program, which drew kudos from Dakota Electric in its customer magazine.
“They say the new LED saves Burnsville 101,000 kilowatts each season, enough energy to operate 10 homes for a year , ”Delmoro s a i d .
He stressed that the Burnsville Community Foundation —not the city —pays all the costs of the lighting.
“We pay for the contractor, we pay for the electricity, we pay for any staff time that’s involved with the city —and there are still people that think it’s tax money, after 12 years,”Delmoro said.
He said the program has blessed him with ties to his community that go beyond his neighborhood and church. That was especially apparent when Delmoro’s wife, Linda, died in March 2005.
“When Linda died, I found out who the real beneficiary of this giving was,”he said. “There was such an outpouring from people that I connected with and met through asking for money. I was embraced by the community, and I thought, ‘Wow, the more you try to give, the more you get back.’”
For information about donating or sponsoring a snowflake, call Delmoro at (952) 890- 1770.
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Earley Lake - 2017Day Park and the Earley Lake and Trail are a four-acre park located on the northeast corner of County Road 5 and Southcross Drive. These are named for the Earley and Day families.
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Fall in BurnsvilleAn undeveloped area of Burnsville near County Road 11 and McAndrews Road identified by the water tower in the background.
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June 9, 2017 I Love BurnsvillePeople gathering for the Friday evening performance and movie at I love Burnsville at park at Ames Center.
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June 9, 2017 I Love BurnsvilleThe Friday evening I Love Burnsville event included cake and entertainment. Photo provided by: Burnsville Convention & Visitors Bureau.
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June 9, 2017 I Love BurnsvilleEvery June, Burnsville hosts a week-long celebration of everything that makes our community a great place to live, work, and play! Hundreds of people turn out to participate in events, meet their neighbors and have lots of food and fun. Every year brings new and exciting activities as well as perennial favorites Photo provided by: Burnsville Convention & Visitors Bureau.
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June 9, 2017 I Love BurnsvilleListening to music and enjoying the Friday evening I Love Burnsville event. Photo provided by: Burnsville Convention & Visitors Bureau.
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June 9, 2017 I Love Burnsvillethe Mayor and others at the I Love Burnsville Friday events. Photo provided by: Burnsville Convention & Visitors Bureau.
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June 9, 2017 I Love BurnsvilleRandom photos of people enjoying the Friday evening I Love Burnsville event.
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June 9, 2017 I Love BurnsvilleFriday, June 9

Wrap up I Love Burnsville Week and kick off this summer’s movie and concert series with an evening of food, entertainment and fun. The event will include live music, shaved ice, food trucks and an outdoor movie featuring the Minnesota-favorite “The Mighty Duck. Photo provided by: Burnsville Convention & Visitors Bureau.
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June 9, 2017 I Love BurnsvilleMusical performance during the final night of I Love Burnsville. Photo provided by: Burnsville Convention & Visitors Bureau.
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Pleasant View Cemetery - 2017Back of sign when leaving cemetery.
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