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2010_census_burnsville.pdf
2010 Census information Burnsville2010 Census figures

Burnsville Population lnformation
. Population - 60,306
. Persons 18 and over - 45,782
. Children under 18 - 14,324
* Median Age - 35.9 years old
. Minority Population - 22.5%
. Nearly 10% speak a different language other than English at home

Household lnformation
. Households - 24,283
. Average Household Size - 2.47 persons
. Owner Occupied Units - 16,051- or 66% of all units
. Rental Units - 8,232 or 34% of all units
. Median Value of Owner Occupied Dwelling Unit - $149,600
. 13.8% of total housing units are owned with no mortgage
. Median Rent for a Dwelling Unit - $737
. Median household income is 557,420

Education*
" 93% of persons 25 and over have graduated from high school
. 25% have completed a Bachelor's Degree
. 10% have a Graduate or Professional Degree

Employmentt*
. 75r% of persons over 16 years old are in the workforce
" 81% drive to work alone
. 8% carpool
. 4% use alternative transporlation
* 3% work at horne
. 23 minutes is the average commute time to work
*39% of employed residents are in management or professional occupations
. 16% are employed in service industries
. 28% work in saies
. 7% construction
. 10% production and transportation
2011_2012_public_safety_fire.pdf
2011 - 2012 City of Burnsville Residents GuidePage 20 - addresses Public Safety - the Fire and Police Departments. The Burnsville Police Department was formed in 1964 on a vision of progressive law enforcement principles. The department is now comprised of 75 sworn and 19 civilian personnel. The Police Citizens Academy and Neighborhood Watch are featured.
2012_election_results.pdf
2012 Election resultsIncumbent mayor Elizabeth Kautz was elected to her seventh term after defeating Jerry Willenburg. She will serve a four year term until December 31, 2016.

In the four person race for two city council seats, incumbent Mary Sherry was the top vote-getter earning a four year term. This is her second term. She will be joined by first-time council member Suzanne Nguyen, also willing a four year term. Both will serve until December 31, 2016.

Votes: Kautz 16,600 Willenburg 12,379
Sherry - 13,606 Nguyen 9,702 Cherney 9,396 and Johnson 9,214
2014_results_election.pdf
2014 Election ResultsIncumbents Dan Kealey and Bill Coughlin were both reelected to the Burnsville City Council November 4, 2014. It was a four person race, both will serve a four year term expiring 2018..

Results - Dan Kealey 8269, Bill Coughlin 8022, Cara Schulz 7189, Jake Nelson 3689, Write-in-votes 140.
A total 21,600 residents voted, 57% of the eligible voters.
2017_council.jpg
Burnsville City Council meeting2017 City Council meeting. Photo compliments of the City of Burnsville.
20182520Monitoring2520Report_201901031251390507.pdf
2018 Annual Monitoring report for the City of BurnsvilleThe City of Burnsville’s Annual Monitoring Report provides an
overview of the services provided over the previous year. All
data and information referenced is accurate from Oct. 1, 2017
through Sept. 30, 2018...
2018_10_092520Burnsville2520City2520Council2520Update.pdf
Burnsville Center Co. Rd. 42 Corridor Study 2018A planning document addressing the future of Burnsville's County Road 42 Corridor.
2018_County_Commissioners.pdf
Dakota County Commissioners 2018Seven individuals are elected as County Commissioners. Burnsville's in 2018 was Liz Workman. Others serving were: Mike Slavik, Kathleen Gaylord, Thomas Egan, Joe Atkins, Mary Liz Holberg and Chris Gerlach.
2018_logo_flag.JPG
2018 City of Burnsville flagCity of Burnsville Flag 2018 with City's new logo graphic.
20192520State2520of2520the2520City2520Address_201902131042372778.pdf
2019 January State of the City Address (click to open)2019 State of the City Address, by Mayor Elizabeth Kautz . February 13, 2019 at the Ames Center.
2019_cable.pdf
Burnsville Cable TV (BCTV)A profile of Burnsville's Cable television appearing in the 2019 - 2020 Community Guide.
2019_Fall_Recognition_Invite.pdf
City thanks volunteersCity of Burnsville recognizes its volunteers October 14, 2019.
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Burnsville Fire Truck 20192019 Fire truck door.
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City of Burnsville flagThe City of Burnsville flag showing the "new" 2018 logo.
20402520Comprehensive2520Plan2520Update2520Final_sm_201907161103262066.pdf
The 2040 comprehensive planThe 2040 comprehensive plan created in 2019.
2040_Comp2520Plan.pdf
Burnsville Comprehensive plan 2040The City of Burnsville in 2018 creates its comprehensive plan for 2040.
2040_comprehensive_plan.pdf
2040 Comprehensive Plan nearing completion 2017The Burnsville Bulletin Fall 2017 reports the initial draft of Burnsville's 2040 Comprehensive Plan is nearly complete and moving into the final stages.
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Dan GustafsonDan Gustafson, Council member. Original photo compliments of the City of Burnsville.
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Touch a Truck 2019Touch-a-Truck at Public Works Open House was Saturday, May 18, 2019 to celebrate National Public Works Week with Burnsville's first Public Works Open House!

The Touch-A-Truck event featured equipment from the City's Fleet, Streets, Utilities, Forestry, Parks and Engineering divisions as well as the Police Department's Mobile Command Vehicle, a fire truck from the Fire Department and a large loader from Kraemer Mining. Kids even helped "paint-a-plow" with sidewalk chalk. Photo compliments of the City of Burnsville.
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Touch a Truck 2019Touch-a-Truck at Public Works Open House was Saturday, May 18, 2019 to celebrate National Public Works Week with Burnsville's first Public Works Open House!

The Touch-A-Truck event featured equipment from the City's Fleet, Streets, Utilities, Forestry, Parks and Engineering divisions as well as the Police Department's Mobile Command Vehicle, a fire truck from the Fire Department and a large loader from Kraemer Mining. Kids even helped "paint-a-plow" with sidewalk chalk. Photo compliments of the City of Burnsville.
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Party on the Plaza 2019#Burnsville Love - Party on the Plaza, June 2019.
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Party on the Plaza 2019#Burnsville Love - Party on the Plaza, June 2019, photo compliments of the City of Burnsville.
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Burnsville City Hall 2017Another view of the entry into the City Hall.
Arbor_Day_2017__2.jpg
Arbor Day 2017 and Sustainability Man.Sustainability Man celebrated Arbor Day on April 28, 2017. He helped Ms. Schilling's Sky Oaks 5th grade class plant common milkweed by the Burnsville Ice Center. Photo compliments of the City of Burnsville.
Arbor_Day_2017___5.jpg
Arbor Day 2017 and Sustainability Man.Sustainability Man celebrated Arbor Day on April 28, 2017. He helped plant a tree with Experience Burnsville and helped Ms. Schilling's Sky Oaks 5th grade class plant common milkweed by the Burnsville Ice Center. Photo compliments of the City of Burnsville.
at_school.jpg
You Belong Here 2019The You belong here poster at one of the Burnsville Schools.
belong_2.pdf
City of Burnsville unveils "You Belong Here" motto 2019September 9, 2019 Savage Pacer reports on the unveiling of Burnsville's "You Belong Here" motto.
By Christine Schuster cschuster@swpub.com Sep 9, 2019


You Belong Here Burnsville

Burnsville Mayor Elizabeth Kautz adopted the city’s official motto, “You Belong Here” at the Sept. 3 City Council meeting. Letters displaying the motto were unveiled at the entrance of Burnsville Civic Center Park during the city’s annual Fire Muster celebration Sept. 4-7.
Photo by Christine Schuster


BURNSVILLE — The city of Burnsville launched a new motto focused on inclusion at the annual Fire Muster festival last week.

Burnsville Mayor Elizabeth Kautz proclaimed the city’s official motto, “You Belong Here,” at the Sept. 3 City Council meeting. Four-foot tall letters spelling out the motto were unveiled at the entrance of Burnsville Civic Center Park during the muster Sept. 4-7.

Burnsville strives to be an inclusive place for its diverse residents and visitors, Kautz said during the proclamation. Continuing to “welcome new faces and businesses will further enrich our culture and opportunities for success,” she said.

The city heard feedback from over 1,000 residents, non-residents and community stakeholders in developing the messaging campaign, according to the city.

History of Fire Muster

The Fire Muster celebration started to take root in the late 1970s, when Roger Jackson, a Burnsville resident and fire equipment collector, began entertaining children each summer by displaying his equipment and organizing a small parade down Nicollet Avenue, according to the Fire Muster website.

The official city-wide celebration began in 1980.

The festival draws fire equipment from departments and collectors from throughout the Midwest. In 2004, the Fire Muster’s Fire Truck Parade was cited in the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest fire truck parade in the world with over 120 trucks.

Today, the festival is organized by a nonprofit corporation, similar to Savage’s Dan Patch Days.
belong_article.pdf
You belong here - 2019Burnsville Eagan Sun/Thisweek News - September 12, 2019 reports on the unveiling of Burnsville's new slogan...

You Belong Here- by John Gessner Sept 12, 2019

Burnsville unveils new branding slogan

You Belong Here, the city of Burnsville announced last weekend, rolling out the slogan from a branding and marketing campaign aimed at wooing business and burnishing the mature community’s image.

The slogan was publicly debuted at the 39th annual Burnsville Fire Muster, where it was displayed in 4-foot letters at the entrance to the festival grounds in Civic Center Park.

The punchy message was stenciled and spray-painted throughout the grounds, where it was also geo-tagged on Snapchat.

The $195,000 branding campaign is part of a larger economic development and redevelopment plan the City Council launched last year. Its goals include improving the images of the city and Burnsville-Eagan-Savage School District 191, ensuring continued viability of Burnsville Center and the County Road 42 corridor, maintaining Burnsville’s status as a regional destination and continuing development in the Heart of the City.

You Belong Here is adaptable to multiple audiences, from longtime residents to would-be residents and businesses, said Marty Doll, the city’s communications and community engagement director.

“We definitely want the community to feel that sense and buy into this theme of You Belong Here,” Doll said. “It came out of a lot of community focus groups and surveys, so of course we want the internal community to see it and feel it and believe in it. But we also want to have a big focus externally, outside of Burnsville.”

The next step is working with consultant AE2S on a marketing plan, Doll said. Advertising in trade publications, on billboards and on Minnesota Valley Transit Authority buses are possibilities, he said.

The slogan will typically be paired with the city’s blue and green logo depicting water and trees, according to Doll.

Placement of the slogan on city structures and vehicles will be determined as they need replacing or upgrading, according to Doll. One giant platform — the Heather Hills water tower, Burnsville’s largest — will become available when it’s repainted next year, but officials haven’t decided whether to use the slogan, Doll said.

The city’s $195,000 contract with AE2S, a division of Advanced Engineering and Environmental Services, includes funding for marketing as well as brand development.

More than 1,400 people contributed to branding the process, AE2S said: 805 respondents to a digital survey, 30 people engaged for interviews and group discussions, 600 people who wrote on display boards or responded to questions at community events, and 20 Burnsville third-graders whose entries in the I Love Burnsville Week essay contest were reviewed.

A common theme among the responses is that Burnsville is a “beautiful city with many parks and green spaces,” an AE2S report said. “People enjoyed the opportunity to live in a greater natural environment (and) still be close to the amenities of the Twin Cities. This was most prevalent in ages 36-plus.”

Many in that demographic said they “felt safe” in Burnsville, a great city to raise kids, the report said.

“Another common response pointed to the diversity of the community,” the report said. “Many felt that diversity was a positive and added to the cultural richness of the community, especially those in the 26-45 age group.”

Other common themes were the need to improve “negative perceptions” of School District 191 and to improve the Burnsville Center area, the report said.

AE2S compiled a list of 40 possible themes based on community input. The list was narrowed to eight after review by a city team and to four with further review by AE2S and city staffers along with representatives of District 191, Experience Burnsville and the Burnsville YMCA leadership.

Among the four finalists, You Belong Here was the top choice in weighted ranked-choice voting by the project team and City Council members.

It was up to the City Council at an Aug. 13 work session to choose between You Belong Here; Community with Unity; Naturally Beautiful Uniquely Burnsville; and Community. Opportunity. Unity.

In earlier voting by the project team and council members, You Belong Here was the top choice in weighted ranked-choice voting.

At the work session, council members Dan Gustafson, Dan Kealey and Vince Workman backed You Belong Here.

It’s appropriate for a diverse city, where “we need to put the message out to people — if you live here, you’re family here. ... If you’re here, this is your home,” Gustafson said.

Workman said the slogan is “versatile, clean, simple,” with “a lot of emotional appeal.”

Mayor Elizabeth Kautz, absent from the work session, left word that she preferred Community with Unity.

Council Member Cara Schulz said none of the four excited her, and she’d go with the council’s majority choice.

“I am hopeful that the implementation brings up that logo and the tagline and makes me more whelmed, because I am under the whelm,” Schulz said.
board2019.jpg
Dakota County Board of Commissioners- Liz Workman Burnsville.Dakota County Board of Commissioners 2019. Burnsville is District 5.

Population by District
District Population
District 1 – Mike Slavik 61,135
District 2 – Kathleen A. Gaylord 53,172
District 3 – Thomas A. Egan 56,574
District 4 – Joe Atkins 56,163
District 5 – Liz Workman 60,306
District 6 – Mary Liz Holberg 55,954
District 7 – Chris Gerlach 55,248
total 398,552

Body_cams_a_plus_2017.pdf
Seven years of body cams a plus, says police chief 2017The August 4, 2017 edition of the Burnsville Sun/Thisweek news reports on Burnsville Police Department pioneering the use of body cameras seven years before.
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