A powerful research tool for the serious or casual visitor.
Home > Dakotah Heritage (Indigenous Peoples) > Dakotah

1851_Land_Cession_Treaties.pdf
1851 Land Cession Treaties1851 Dakota Land Cession Treaties
(material from treatiesmatter.org)
This website was created as a supplement to Why Treaties Matter - Self Government in the Dakota and Ojibwe Nations, a travelling exhibit on treaties between Dakota and Ojibwe people and the U.S.. The project is a collaboration of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, the Minnesota Humanities Center, and the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. The 15-minute video presented above, produced by the National Museum of the American Indian, introduces the themes of the exhibit: that tribal government's exercise indigenous sovereignty today, and that indigenous sovereignty was not given in treaties, but retained in treaties.

TWO TREATIES
Treaty with the Sioux, Signed July 23, 1851 at Traverse des Sioux, MN
Treaty with the Sioux, Signed August 6, 1851 at Mendota

In these transformative treaties, Dakota people sold most of their land to the U.S. in exchange for $3,750,000 (estimated at 12 cents per acre), to be paid over decades. Little of the payment was received. The treaty stipulated that they would retain a strip of land 20 miles wide, spanning the Minnesota River; this article was unilaterally removed by the U.S. Senate, but later reinstated by legislation.

In their report to Congress on these treaties, commissioners Alexander Ramsey and Luke Lea justified this enormous land cession by the Dakota – “larger than the State of New York, and rich, fertile, and beautiful, beyond description” – by writing that…

"It is needed as an additional outlet to the overwhelming tide of migration which is both increasing and irresistible in its westward progress."

At least two things are misleading about this statement.

First, there was no tide of migration to Dakota country in 1851. In the 1850 census, the entire “white and mulatto” population of Minnesota Territory (which stretched far into present-day North and South Dakota) was less than 6,100 people, living on more than 9,000 square miles ceded by Dakota and Ojibwe people in 1837 and 1847. (By contrast, Lea and Ramsey estimated that 8,000 Dakota people would be affected by these treaties.) The U.S. acquisition of another 35,000 square miles was “necessitated” not by settlers anxious to move there – although the land was, of course, very attractive – but by land speculators who wanted to divert migration to Minnesota from Iowa and Wisconsin, which had recently become states. The land cession did result in a “tide of migration,” but was not directly caused by one.

Secondly, Ramsey and Lea did not mention the interests of fur traders in the treaty, though they were well aware that traders had engineered the entire land cession. As Lucille Kane noted in “The Sioux Treaties and the Traders,”

"… by 1851 the traders had on their books debts amounting to almost half a million dollars. The fur trade was declining, and, without other means of getting their money, the traders looked to the funds the Indians would receive for their lands after signing the treaties. When the call for the treaty went out, traders flocked from posts near and far to Traverse des Sioux and Mendota to push the negotiations."
—Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1851, p. 281
fur trade was declining, and, without other means of getting their money, the traders looked to the funds the Indians would receive for their lands after signing the treaties. When the call for the treaty went out, traders flocked from posts near and far to Traverse des Sioux and Mendota to push the negotiations."

—Annual Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1851, p. 281

Of the compensation promised to the Dakota for their land, debt payments - inflated by the traders - came off the top. Another $60,000 was to be spent hiring (white) blacksmiths and preparing the Dakota to make a transition to farming. The remainder was to be placed in trust, with 5% paid to the Dakota per year. Of this money, half would be used to buy goods and services from the traders.

Though the benefits to traders and speculators are entirely omitted in their report, Ramsey and Lea spent pages talking about how the Dakota would benefit from the reduction of their homeland to a strip only 20 miles wide. The greatest benefit, in the eyes of Ramsey and Lea, would be an assault on Dakota culture:
"It was our constant aim to do what we could to break up the community system among the Indians, and cause them to recognise the individuality of property... If timely measures are taken for the proper location and management of these tribes, they may, at no distant
period, become an intelligent and Christian people."
1851_Treaty_of_Mendota.pdf
Treaty of Mendota 1851TREATY WITH THE SIOUX—MDEWAKANTON AND WAHPAKOOTA BANDS, 1851.
Aug. 5. 1851. | 10 Stats., 954. | Proclamation Feb. 24, 1853.

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Mendota, in the Territory of Minnesota, on the fifth day of August, eighteen hundred and fifty-one, between the United States of America, by Luke Lea, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and Alexander Ramsey, governor and ex-officio superintendent of Indian affairs in said Territory, commissioners duly appointed for that purpose, and the Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Dakota and Sioux Indians.

ARTICLE 1.

The peace and friendship existing between the United States and the Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians shall be perpetual.

ARTICLE 2.

The said Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Indians do hereby cede and relinquish all their lands and all their right, title and claim to any lands whatever, in the Territory of Minnesota, or in the State of Iowa.

ARTICLE 3.

[Stricken out.]

ARTICLE 4.

In further and full consideration of said cession and relinquishment, the United States agree to pay to said Indians the sum of one million four hundred and ten thousand dollars, ($1,410,000,) at the several times, in the manner and for the purposes following, to wit:
1st. To the chiefs of the said bands, to enable them to settle their affairs and comply with their present just engagements; and in consideration of their removing themselves to the country set apart for them as above, (which they agree to do within one year after the ratification of this treaty, without further cost or expense to the United States,) and in consideration of their subsisting themselves the first year after their removal, (which they agree to do without further cost or expense on the part of the United States,) the sum of two hundred and twenty thousand dollars ($220,000.) Provided, That said sum shall be paid, one-half to the chiefs of the Med-ay-wa-kan-toan band, and one-half to the chief and headmen of the Wah-pay-koo-tay band, in such manner as they, hereafter, in open council, shall respectively request, and as soon after the removal of said Indians to the home set apart for them as the necessary appropriations therefor shall be made by Congress.
2d. To be laid out, under the direction of the President, for the establishment of manual-labor schools; the erection of mills and blacksmith shops, opening farms, fencing and breaking land, and for such other beneficial objects as may be deemed most conducive to the prosperity and happiness of said Indians, thirty thousand dollars ($30,000.)
The balance of said sum of one million four hundred and ten thousand dollars, ($1,410,000,) to wit: one million, one hundred and sixty thousand dollars ($1,160,000) to remain in trust with the United States, and five per cent. interest thereon to be paid annually to said Indians for the period of fifty years, commencing on the first day of July, eighteen hundred and fifty-two (1852,) which shall be in f ull payment of said balance, principal and interest: said payments to be made and applied, under the direction of the President as follows, to wit:
3d. For a general agricultural improvement and civilization fund, the sum of twelve thousand dollars, ($12,000.)
4th. For educational purposes, the sum of six thousand dollars, ($6,000.)
5th. For the purchase of goods and provisions, the sum of ten thousand dollars, ($10,000.)
6th. For money annuity, the sum of thirty thousand dollars, ($30,000.)

Page 592

ARTICLE 5.

The entire annuity, provided for in the first section of the second article of the treaty of September twenty-ninth, eighteen hundred and thirty-seven, (1837,) including an unexpended balance that may be in the Treasury on the first of July, eighteen hundred and fifty-two, (1852,) shall thereafter be paid in money.

ARTICLE 6.

The laws of the United States prohibiting the introduction and sale of spirituous liquors in the Indian country shall be in full force and effect throughout the territory hereby ceded and lying in Minnesota until otherwise directed by Congress or the President of the United States.

ARTICLE 7.

Rules and regulations to protect the rights of persons and property among the Indian parties to this Treaty, and adapted to their condition and wants, may be prescribed and enforced in such manner as the President or the Congress of the United States, from time to time, shall direct.

In witness whereof, the said Luke Lea and Alexander Ramsey, Commissioners on the part of the United States and the undersigned Chiefs and Headmen of the Med-ay-wa-kan-toan and Wah-pay-koo-tay bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians, have hereunto set their hands, at Mendota, in the Territory of Minnesota, this fifth day of August, Anno Domini, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one.

L. Lea.

Alex. Ramsey.

Med-ay-wa-kan-toans.

Chief Ta-oya-te-duta, (his scarlet people, or “Little Crow,”)

Headmen Wa-kan-o-zhan, (Sacred Light, or Medicine Bottle,)

Tee-tchay, (Top of the Lodge or “Jim.” or “Old Thad,”)

Ta-tchan-h' pee-sa-pa, (His “Black Tomahawk.”)

Ma-ka-na-ho-toan-ma-nee, (At whose tread the earth resounds,)

H'-da-ee-yan-kay, (he runs rattling,)

Too-kan-a-hena-ma-nee, (Walker on the Medicine Boulders or Stones,)

Wa-m'dee-doo-ta, (Scarlet War Eagle,)

Na-ghee-yoo-shkan, (He moves the Ghosts or Shadows,)

Shoank'-a-ska, (“White Dog,”)

Hoo-sa-nee-ghee, (one leg yellow or orange colored,)

Wa-keen-yan-wash-tay, (“Good Thunder,”)

Chief Wa-pa-sha, (The Standard, or “Red Leaf,”)

Headmen Wa-kan-hendee-o-ta, (Many Lightnings,)

Tchan-h'pee-yoo-ka, (He has a war club,)

Heen-han-doo-ta, (Red Owl,)

Ma ka-ka-ee-day, (He sets the Earth on fire,)

Ee-a-hee-herday, (He bursts out speaking,)

Chief Wa-koo-tay, (The “Shooter,”)

Headmen Ma-h'pee-ya-ma za, (Metal cloud,)

Ta-ma-za-ho-wash-tay, (his good iron voice,)

Ma-ka ta-na-zheen, (He stands on the earth,)

Ee-wan-kam-ee-na-zhan, (He stands above,)

Wa-kan-ta-pay-ta, (The Spirit's Fire,)

Na-ghee-mee-tcha-keetay, (He kills the Ghosts,)

Een-yan-sha-sha, (Red Stones,)

Ee-day-wa-kan, (Sacred Blaze,)

Ta-sag-yay-ma-za, (His metal Staff,)

Chief Ma-h'pee mee-tchash-tay, (man of the sky,)

Headmen Wee-tchan-h'pee, (The Star,)

Ta-tay-na-zhee-na, (Little standing Wind,)

Headmen Hoak-shee-dan-doo-ta, (Scarlet Boy,)

Am-pay-sho-ta, (Smoky Day,)

Ha-ha-ka-ma-za, (Metal Elk,)

Ta - tay - h'moo - he - ya - ya, (“Whistling Wind,”)

Wa-pa-ma-nee, (He strikes walking,)

Ma-h'pee-ya-wa-kan, (Sacred Cloud,)

Ta-tchan-h'pee-ma-za, (His Iron War Club,)

Chief Ma-za-ho-ta, (Gray Metal,)

Headmen Wa-soo-mee-tchash-ta-shnee, (Wicked or “Bad Hail,”)

Oan-ketay-hee-dan, (Little Water-God or “Little Whale,”)

Tcha-noon-pay-sa, (The Smoker,)

Ta-tay-to-kay-tcha, (Other wind,)

Ka-ho, (The Rambler about,)

Chief Ta-tchan-koo-wash-tay, (Good Road,)

Headmen Ta-tay-o-wo-teen-ma-nee, (Roaring Wind that walks,)

O-yay-tchan-ma-nee, (Track Maker,)

Page 593

Ta-shoark-ay, (His Dog,)

Chief Sha-k'pay, (“Six,”)

Headmen A-no-ghee-ma-zheen, (He that stands on both sides,)

Hoo-ya-pa, (Eagle Head,)

Ta-tay-mee-na, (Round Wind,)

Ka-t'pan-t' pan-oo, (He comes pounding to pieces,)

Ma-h'pee-ya-henda-keen-yan, (Walking across a cloud,)

Wa-pee-ghee, (The orange red speckled cloud,)

Ma-za-wa-menoo-ha, (Gourd shell metal medicine rattle,)

Chief Hay-ee-tcha-h'moo-ma-nee, (Horn whistling walking,)

Headmen Pay-pay, (Sharp,)

Ta-wo-ta-way-doo-ta, (His Scarlet Armor,)

Hay-pee, (Third Son,)

A-pay-ho-ta, (Grey mane or crest,)

Ho-tan-een, (His voice can be heard,)

Ma-h'pee-ya-shee-tcha, (Bad Cloud,)

Ta-wa-tcheen, (His mind,)

Han-yay-too-ko-kee-pa-pee, (Night which is feared,)

In presence of Thomas Foster, Secretary. Nathaniel McLean, Indian Agent. Alexander Fariboult, P. Prescott, G. H. Pond, Interpreters. David Olmstead; W. C. Henderson; Alexis Bailly; Richard Chute; A. Jackson; A. L. Larpenteur; W. H. Randall, Sr.; A. S. H. White; H. L. Dousman; Frederic B. Sibley; Marten McLeod; Geo. H. Faribault.

To the Indian names are subjoined marks.

SUPPLEMENTAL ARTICLE.
1st. The United States do hereby stipulate to pay the Sioux bands of Indians, parties to this treaty, at the rate of ten cents per acre, for the lands included in the reservation provided for in the third article of the treaty as originally agreed upon in the following words:

ARTICLE 3.

“In part consideration of the foregoing cession and relinquishment, the United States do hereby set apart for the future occupancy and home of the Dakota Indians, parties to this treaty, to be held by them as Indian lands are held, a tract of country of the average width of ten miles on either side of the Minnesota River, and bounded on the west by the Tchaytam-bay and Yellow Medicine Rivers, and on the east by the Little Rock River and a line running due south from its mouth to the Waraju River; the boundaries of said tract to be marked out by as straight lines as practicable, whenever and in such manner as the President of the United States shall direct: Provided, That said tract shall be held and occupied by said bands in common, and that they shall hereafter participate equally and alike, in all the benefits derived from any former treaty between said bands, or either of them, and the United States,” which article has been stricken out of the treaty by the Senate. The said payment to be in lieu of said reservation; the amount, when ascertained under instructions from the Department of the Interior, to be added to the trust fund provided for in the fourth article.
2d. It is further stipulated that the President be authorized, with the assent of the said bands of Indians, parties to this treaty, and as soon after they shall have given their assent to the foregoing article, as may be convenient, to cause to be set apart by appropriate landmarks and boundaries, such tracts of country without the limits of the cession made by the first article of the treaty as may be satisfactory for their future occupancy and home: Provided, That the President may, by the consent of these Indians, vary the conditions aforesaid if deemed expedient.
1851_Treaty_Sioux_Sisseton-Wahpeton.pdf
Treaty of Traverse de Sioux 1851TREATY WITH THE SIOUX—SISSETON AND WAHPETON BANDS, 1851
July 23, 1851. | 10 Stats., 949. | Proclamation, Feb. 24. 1853.

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Traverse des Sioux, upon the Minnesota River, in the Territory of Minnesota, on the twenty-third day of July, eighteen hundred and fifty-one, between the United States of America, by Luke Lea, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and Alexander Ramsey, governor and ex-officio superintendent of Indian affairs in said Territory, commissioners duly appointed for that purpose, and See-see-toan and Wah-pay-toan bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians.

ARTICLE 1.

It is stipulated and solemnly agreed that the peace and friendship now so happily existing between the United States and the aforesaid bands of Indians, shall be perpetual.

ARTICLE 2.

The said See-see-toan and Wah-pay-toan bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians, agree to cede, and do hereby cede, sell, and relinquish to the United States, all their lands in the State of Iowa; and, also all their lands in the Territory of Minnesota, lying east of the following line, to wit: Beginning at the junction of the Buffalo River with the Red River of the North; thence along the western bank of said Red River of the North, to the mouth of the Sioux Wood River; thence along the western bank of said Sioux Wood River to Lake Traverse; thence, along the western shore of said lake, to the southern extremity thereof; thence in a direct line, to the junction of Kampeska Lake with the Tchan-kas-an-data, or Sioux River; thence along the western bank of said river to its point of intersection with the northern line of the State of Iowa; including all the islands in said rivers and lake.

ARTICLE 3.

[Stricken out.]
ARTICLE 4.

In further and full consideration of said cession, the United States agree to pay to said Indians the sum of one million six

Page 589

hundred and sixty-five thousand dollars ($1,665,000,) at the several times, in the manner and for the purposes following, to wit:
1st. To the chiefs of the said bands, to enable them to settle their affairs and comply with their present just engagement; and in consideration of their removing themselves to the country set apart for them as above, which they agree to do within two years, or sooner, if required by the President, without further cost or expense to the United States, and in consideration of their subsisting themselves the first year after their removal, which they agree to do without further cost or expense on the part of the United States, the sum of two hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars, ($275,000):Provided, That said sum shall be paid to the chiefs in such manner as they, hereafter, in open council shall request, and as soon after the removal of said Indians to the home set apart for them, as the necessary appropriation therefor shall be made by Congress.
2d. To be laid out under the direction of the President for the establishment of manual-labor schools; the erection of mills and blacksmith shops, opening farms, fencing and breaking land, and for such other beneficial objects as may be deemed most conducive to the prosperity and happiness of said Indians, thirty thousand dollars, ($30,000.)
The balance of said sum of one million six hundred and sixty-five thousand dollars, ($1,665,000,) to wit: one million three hundred and sixty thousand dollars ($1,360,000) to remain in trust with the United States, and five per cent interest thereon to be paid, annually, to said Indians for the period of fifty years, commencing the first day of July, eighteen hundred and fifty-two (1852,) which shall be in full payment of said balance, principal and interest, the said payment to be applied under the direction of the President, as follows, to wit:
3d. For a general agricultural improvement and civilization fund, the sum of twelve thousand dollars, ($12,000.)
4th. For educational purposes, the sum of six thousand dollars, ($6,000.)
5th. For the purchase of goods and provisions, the sum of ten thousand dollars, ($10,000.)
6th. For money annuity, the sum of forty thousand dollars,($40,000.)

ARTICLE 5.

The laws of the United States, prohibiting the introduction and sale of spirituous liquors in the Indian country shall be in full force and effect throughout the territory hereby ceded and lying in Minnesota until otherwise directed by Congress or the President of the United States.

ARTICLE 6.
Rules and regulations to protect the rights of persons and property among the Indians, parties to this treaty, and adapted to their condition and wants, may be prescribed and enforced in such manner as the President or the Congress of the United States, from time to time, shall direct.

In testimony whereof, the said Commissioners, Luke Lea and Alexander Ramsey, and the undersigned Chiefs and Headmen of the aforesaid See-see-toan and Wah-pay-toan bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, in duplicate, at Traverse des Sioux, Territory of Minnesota, this twenty-third day of July, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one.

L. Lea, [SEAL.]

Alex. Ramsey, [SEAL.]

Een-yang-ma-nee (Running Walker or “the Gun,”)

Wee-tchan-h' pee-ee-tay-toan, (the Star face or the “Orphan,”)

Ee-tay-wa-keen-yan, (“Limping Devil” or “Thunder Face,”)

Eesh-ta-hum-ba, (“Sleepy Eyes,”)

Oo-pee-ya-hen-day-a, (Extending his train,)

Hoak-shee-dan-wash-tay, (Good Boy,)

Ee-tay-tcho-ka, (Face in the midst,)

Hay-ha-hen-day-ma-za, (Metal Horn,)

Am-pay-too-sha, (Red Day,)

Eesh-ta-humba-koash-ka, (Sleepy Eyes young,)

A na-wang-ma-nee, (Who goes galloping on,)

Ma-h'pee-wee-tchash-ta, (Cloud man,)

Page 590

Tan-pa-hee-da, (Sounding Moccasin,)

Eenk-pa, (the upper end,)

Wee-yoa-kee-yay, (Standard,)

Wa-kan-man-nee, (Walking Spirit,)

Ee-tay-sha, (the one that reddens his face,)

Ta-ka-ghay, (Elk maker,)

Wa-ma-ksoon-tay, (“Walnut,” or Blunt headed arrow,)

Ma-za-sh'a, (Metal Sounding,)

Ya-shoa-pee, (The wind instrument,)

Noan-pa keen-yan, (Twice Flying,)

Wash-tay-da, (Good, a little,)

Wa-keen-yan-ho-ta, (Grey Thunder,)

Wa-shee-tchoon-ma-za, (Iron French man,)

Ta-pe-ta-tan-ka, (His Big fire,)

Ma-h'pee-ya-h'na-shkan-shkan, (Moving Cloud,)

Wa-na-pay-a, (The pursuer,)

Ee-tcha-shkan-shkan-ma-nee, (Who walks shaking,)

Ta-wa-kan-he-day-ma-za, (His Metal Lighthing,)

Ee-tay doo-ta, (Red Face,)

Henok-marpi-yahdi-nape, (Reappearing Cloud,)

Tchan-hedaysh-ka-ho-toan-ma-nee, (the moving sounding Harp)

Ma-zaku-te-ma-ni, (Metal walks shooting,)

A-kee-tchee-ta, (Standing Soldier.)

Signed in presence of Thomas Foster, Secretary. Nathaniel McLean, Indian Agent. Alexander Faribault, Stephen R. Riggs, Interpreters. A. S. H. White; Thos. S. Williamson; W. C. Henderson; A. Jackson; James W. Boal; W. G. Le Duc; Alexis Bailly; H. L. Dousman; Hugh Tyler.

To the Indian names are subjoined marks.

SUPPLEMENTAL ARTICLE.
1st. The United States do hereby stipulate to pay the Sioux bands of Indians, parties to this treaty, at the rate of ten cents per acre, for the lands included in the reservation provided for in the third article of the treaty as originally agreed upon in the following words:

“ARTICLE 3.

In part consideration of the foregoing cession, the United States do hereby set apart for the future occupancy and home of the Dakota Indians, parties to this treaty, to be held by them as Indian lands are held, all that tract of country on either side of the Minnesota River, from the western boundary of the lands herein ceded, east, to the Tchay-tam-bay River on the north, and to Yellow Medicine River on the south side, to extend, on each side, a distance of not less than ten miles from the general course of said river; the boundaries of said tract to be marked out by as straight lines as practicable, whenever deemed expedient by the President, and in such manner as he shall direct:” which article has been stricken out of the treaty by the Senate, the said payment to be in lieu of said reservation: the amount when ascertained under instructions from the Department of the Interior, to be added to the trust-fund provided for in the fourth article.
2d. It is further stipulated, that the President be authorized, with the assent of the said band of Indians, parties to this treaty, and as soon after they shall have given their assent to the foregoing article, as may be convenient, to cause to be set apart by appropriate landmarks and boundaries, such tracts of country without the limits of the cession made by the first [2d] article of the treaty as may be satisfactory for their future occupancy and home: Provided, That the President may, by the consent of these Indians, vary the conditions aforesaid if deemed expedient.
77_9470_0808_BU_N_River_Hills_Indian_Burial_Ground_1963.jpg
Indian Burial Ground once located in (North) River Hills 1981
77_9470_2047_BU_Archaeological_dig_findings_1963.jpg
Indian Burial Ground once located in (North) River Hills 1963In 1963 The Science Museum of Minnesota excavated a burial site along the river bluffs across the river from the Black Dog power plant to the south of the Black Dog Village site. The location was the River Hills housing development—a development designed to contain at least 1,000 homes—in Burnsville, the next township south of Eagan along the Minnesota River. The first evidence of human remains was uncovered by a bulldozer operator who was grading the site. Over eleven days seven burial pits containing what were estimated at the time to be at least 56 human beings were excavated. Many of these were bundle burials dating to thousands of years ago. Later work by anthropologist Marcia Regan in a 1990 report estimated that the remains of 36 individuals were included in what was found at the River Hills site.
Black_Dog_Trail_Map.pdf
Black Dog Trail Map and brochureCLICK TO OPEN - A brochure created by Minnesota Valley Wildlife Refuge including Black Dog Preserve trail map.
burial_uncovered_photoscropped.pdf
Indian burial ground uncovered in Burnsville A bulldozer at work on a grading job in Burnsville uncovered bones believed from an Indian burial ground. Fourteen skeletons were uncovered according to Vernon Helmen an archaelogist from the Science Museum. of the st. Paul Institute, it is not possible at the moment to determine their age. Helmen is shown examining the find on the site of the River Hills Housing development.
Chief_Pinneshaws_village_1965.pdf
Chief Pinneshaw's Village was located on the north bank of the Minnesota River 1965Minnesota Valley Review January 7, 1965: A story on the earliest times of life on the bank of the Minnesota River.
Dakota_Presence_in_the_River_Valley4.pdf
Dakota Presence in the River ValleyFrom Medwakanton Dakota 2002.

The Minnesota and Mississippi river valleys have been home to the Dakota for hundreds of years, and the existence of our ancestors was sustained by their relationship with the earth and their surroundings. For generations, Dakota families fished from the rivers, gathered rice from area lakes, and hunted game on the prairies and in river valley woodlands. Along the riverbanks, leaders of the Eastern Dakota, including SAKPE, CASKE, MAZOMANI, WAMBDITANKA, HUYAPA, TACANKU WASTE, and TAOYATEDUTA, established villages. From these home sites, the Eastern Dakota traveled for hunting, gathering, and meeting with other bands of Dakota. Our ancestors lived in harmony with the world around them, and Dakota culture flourished.

Coka Hanska Black Dog Lake Black Dog's Village Burials
Dakota_Valley_Symphony_and_Chorus_2.pdf
Dakota Valley Symphony and Chorus 2017Published in the Ames Center Season Guide August 2017 - June 2018 background and a history of the Dakota Valley Symphony and Chorus, founded in 1986.
DC_Minn_River_Cultural_plan_2016.pdf
Dakota County Minnesota River Greenway Cultural Resources Interpretive plan Nov 3, 2016What we see, hear and feel in the land around us opens views into the past and reveals changes over time. In Dakota tradition, the earth holds memories of what's happened through time.

For thousands of years, the Minnesota River Valley has been home to the Dakota. Today it's an important spiritual center, a place of healing and homecoming.

Today's hikers and bicyclists on the Minnesota River Greenway are moving along the same route that people walked thousands of years before.

This waterway shaped trading and commerce for thousands of years. It moved people and resources. Today's railroads and highways reveal a pattern of movement that still follows the river.

Museum_observer_1963_River_HIlls.pdf
the Science Museum " Observer" 1963The Science Museum St Paul, Volume 3, Number 2, published in 1963. On pages 10 -12 addresses the topic: Salvage Archaeology at the Science Museum and discusses the burial site located in Burnsville Township, Dakota County. Here, a large housing development, River Hills, was being built. During earth moving operations, human bone was uncovered. Fortunately, the builder, Pemtom Inc., and the civil engineering firm involved stopped further work and notified the Minnesota Historical Society of the find....
Oheyanwahi.pdf
Oheyawahi Pilot Knob listed in Nartional Register of Historic placesAlthough located in Mendota Heights, this historic site serves as a significant reminder of the original settlers of the Burnsville, Eagan and Mendota areas of Dakota County.
pilot_knob_1.pdf
Oheyawahe Pilot KnobA portion of an informational brochure about the National Register of Historic Places site in Mendota Heights.
pilot_knob_2.pdf
Oheyawahe Pilot KnobA portion of an informational brochure about the National Register of Historic Places site in Mendota Heights.
pilot_knob_3.pdf
Oheyawahe Pilot KnobA portion of an informational brochure about the National Register of Historic Places site in Mendota Heights.
river_hills_indian_burial_revised.pdf
23 skeletons uncovered at Burnsville Indian Burial siteAugust 15, 1963 the Minneapolis Star/Tribune reports

A total of 23 skeletons have been uncovered so far by a St. Paul archaeologist in an Indian burial grounds on the site of the (North) River Hills housing development in Burnsville.
River_Hill_Burial_Ground~0.pdf
Indian Burial Ground once located in (North) River Hills 1981 version 2 Burnsville Sun Editor Del Stelling reports in Jan 13, 1981 edition - the historical story of the Indian Burial grounds being uncovered in 1963. (2 pages).

A similar story ran in November, 1978 in the Burnsville Sun.
The_Valley_of_Black_Dog_by_Oliver_Towns_1960.pdf
The Valley of Black Dog by Oliver Towne 1960 (3 pages)St. Paul newspaper columnist known as Oliver Towne wrote this history of Black Dog for his newspaper.
A typed transcript and a reprint in the Dakota County Tribune is found within this 3 page PDF.
         
19 files on 1 page(s)