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Dr. Eugue Kuz, Savage Physician
Photo - 1970s.

Dr. Eugene L. Kuz, age 92, of Savage, passed away Sept. 30, 2015, at Mala Strana Rehabilitation Center in New Prague. Eugene was born on Sept. 10, 1923, in Lviv, Ukraine, to Basil and Anna Kuz, the youngest of the couple’s four sons. He attended medical school from 1941 to 1943 before joining the ranks of the independent Ukrainian army, which sought to establish the nation’s sovereignty free from the Soviet Union’s oppression and invading German forces. His unit surrendered to British troops in spring 1945, and after stints in prisoner-of-war camps in Austria and Italy, he was sent to England following the war, eventually receiving his release and full civilian status. He went on to earn a scholarship that the Catholic churches of Ukraine and Ireland created for Ukrainian students to continue their education, enabling him to resume his medical studies. He enrolled at the National University of Ireland, and after finishing his internship at the University College Hospital in Galway and graduating at the top of his class in 1954, he returned to England to practice medicine in Liverpool. A year later, he obtained a visa to travel to the United States, where he had an aunt living in St. Paul, and soon began his 60-year adventure in America.

 Following his arrival, Eugene completed two years of internship and residency in general medicine at various St. Paul hospitals before earning his medical license in 1958 and entering private practice. Two years later, he moved to Savage and opened a family medical clinic, working six to seven days a week while tending to upward of 40 patients a day. On Aug. 12, 1961, he married his wife, Ingrid (Eckermann), a German emigrant with whom he had three children. As his practice flourished, he built a larger clinic at 4029 W. 125th St. in 1963, and joined the surgical staff of St. Francis Hospital in Shakopee. He continued his practice for the next quarter century, treating the young and old, the ill and injured, and rushing off to emergency calls without pause — even on Christmas, much to his young children’s dismay. During his career, whether delivering babies or performing major surgeries, he treated patients with a level of compassion seldom found in today’s world of assembly-line care. As the years passed, he ministered to the children and grandchildren of his earliest patients, and it was his manner as much as his skill that endeared him to generations of area residents.

 Eugene’s devotion to his family, meanwhile, provided his children with a chance to engage in a wide range of academic and athletic pursuits that enriched their youth and propelled them into adulthood with a sense of possibility. He and Ingrid nurtured in them a curiosity about the world and a desire to explore it, and any success they have attained later in life can be traced to the opportunities that abounded in their childhood. His love of languages — he spoke seven fluently, including Latin — was matched by his bottomless knowledge of geography, history, mathematics, medicine, theology, art, literature — and soccer. An insatiable reader and astute observer of politics and world affairs, he remained above all an ardent champion of Ukraine. He was forever eager to enlighten family, friends and strangers alike about his native country, sharing stories about its history, people and culture, and correcting anyone who referred to it as “the Ukraine.” (“We don’t say ‘the America,’ do we?”) When at long last his homeland achieved independence in 1991 after the fall of the Soviet Union, he yearned to make a return visit to the place where he had not set foot in nearly half a century. His health prevented him from attempting the long journey, but to the end, his passion for Ukraine and his hopes for its future were undiminished. A survivor of war as a young man, he thrived in his adopted country as a husband, father and physician, realizing the American dream while still dreaming of Ukraine.

 Eugene is survived by his loving and unfailingly supportive wife of 54 years, Ingrid; his children, Annette (longtime partner Ken); Julian (Cheryl); and Martin; and grandchildren, Annika, Conrad and Kirsten. He was preceded in death by his parents, Basil and Anna; and brothers, Anthony, Julian and Robert. A Mass of Christian Burial will take place Monday, Oct. 5, 2015 at 11 a.m. at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, 4625 W. 125th St., Savage, Minn. Visitation will be held one hour prior to the service at the church.  Interment at St. John's Cemetery.

Dr. Eugue Kuz, Savage Physician

Photo - 1970s.

Dr. Eugene L. Kuz, age 92, of Savage, passed away Sept. 30, 2015, at Mala Strana Rehabilitation Center in New Prague. Eugene was born on Sept. 10, 1923, in Lviv, Ukraine, to Basil and Anna Kuz, the youngest of the couple’s four sons. He attended medical school from 1941 to 1943 before joining the ranks of the independent Ukrainian army, which sought to establish the nation’s sovereignty free from the Soviet Union’s oppression and invading German forces. His unit surrendered to British troops in spring 1945, and after stints in prisoner-of-war camps in Austria and Italy, he was sent to England following the war, eventually receiving his release and full civilian status. He went on to earn a scholarship that the Catholic churches of Ukraine and Ireland created for Ukrainian students to continue their education, enabling him to resume his medical studies. He enrolled at the National University of Ireland, and after finishing his internship at the University College Hospital in Galway and graduating at the top of his class in 1954, he returned to England to practice medicine in Liverpool. A year later, he obtained a visa to travel to the United States, where he had an aunt living in St. Paul, and soon began his 60-year adventure in America.

Following his arrival, Eugene completed two years of internship and residency in general medicine at various St. Paul hospitals before earning his medical license in 1958 and entering private practice. Two years later, he moved to Savage and opened a family medical clinic, working six to seven days a week while tending to upward of 40 patients a day. On Aug. 12, 1961, he married his wife, Ingrid (Eckermann), a German emigrant with whom he had three children. As his practice flourished, he built a larger clinic at 4029 W. 125th St. in 1963, and joined the surgical staff of St. Francis Hospital in Shakopee. He continued his practice for the next quarter century, treating the young and old, the ill and injured, and rushing off to emergency calls without pause — even on Christmas, much to his young children’s dismay. During his career, whether delivering babies or performing major surgeries, he treated patients with a level of compassion seldom found in today’s world of assembly-line care. As the years passed, he ministered to the children and grandchildren of his earliest patients, and it was his manner as much as his skill that endeared him to generations of area residents.

Eugene’s devotion to his family, meanwhile, provided his children with a chance to engage in a wide range of academic and athletic pursuits that enriched their youth and propelled them into adulthood with a sense of possibility. He and Ingrid nurtured in them a curiosity about the world and a desire to explore it, and any success they have attained later in life can be traced to the opportunities that abounded in their childhood. His love of languages — he spoke seven fluently, including Latin — was matched by his bottomless knowledge of geography, history, mathematics, medicine, theology, art, literature — and soccer. An insatiable reader and astute observer of politics and world affairs, he remained above all an ardent champion of Ukraine. He was forever eager to enlighten family, friends and strangers alike about his native country, sharing stories about its history, people and culture, and correcting anyone who referred to it as “the Ukraine.” (“We don’t say ‘the America,’ do we?”) When at long last his homeland achieved independence in 1991 after the fall of the Soviet Union, he yearned to make a return visit to the place where he had not set foot in nearly half a century. His health prevented him from attempting the long journey, but to the end, his passion for Ukraine and his hopes for its future were undiminished. A survivor of war as a young man, he thrived in his adopted country as a husband, father and physician, realizing the American dream while still dreaming of Ukraine.

Eugene is survived by his loving and unfailingly supportive wife of 54 years, Ingrid; his children, Annette (longtime partner Ken); Julian (Cheryl); and Martin; and grandchildren, Annika, Conrad and Kirsten. He was preceded in death by his parents, Basil and Anna; and brothers, Anthony, Julian and Robert. A Mass of Christian Burial will take place Monday, Oct. 5, 2015 at 11 a.m. at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, 4625 W. 125th St., Savage, Minn. Visitation will be held one hour prior to the service at the church. Interment at St. John's Cemetery.

dp_newsletter_fall_2011.pdf drawing_room_at_Savage_estate.jpg drgene.jpg dr__kuz.JPG Dr__Yee_24_yrs_in_savage.pdf
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